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3.^ 
dCCt 

1002. 




2002 



YEARBOOK 




CONSERVATIVE 
CONGREGATIONAL 
CHRISTIAN 
CONFERENCE 




THE BIBLE -- We believe the Bible, consisting of the 
Old and New Testament, to be the only inspired, iner- 
rant, infallible, authoritative Word of God written. 

THE TRINITY -- We believe that there is one God, 
eternally existent in three persons: Father, Son, and 
Holy Ghost. 

THE LORD JESUS CHRIST - We believe in the 
deity of Christ, in His virgin birth, in His sinless life, 
in His miracles, in His vicarious and atoning death 
through His shed blood, in His bodily resurrection, in 
His ascension to the right hand of the Father, and in 
His personal return in power and glory. 

REDEMPTION -- We believe that for salvation of lost 
and sinful man regeneration by the Holy Spirit is ab- 
solutely essential. 

THE HOLY SPIRIT -- We believe in the present ministry of the Holy Spirit by 
Whose indwelling power and fullness the Christian is enabled to live a godly life 
in this present evil world. 

THE RESURRECTION -- We believe in the resurrection of both the saved and 
the lost; they that are saved unto the resurrection of life, and they that are lost 
unto the resurrection of damnation. 

SPIRITUAL UNITY -- We believe in the spiritual unity of all believers in Christ. 

THE SOVEREIGNTY OF CHRIST 

Head of the Church. 
Lord of the Conscience. 

THE UNITY OF CHRIST'S CHURCH 

Redeemed by His death. 
Empowered by His life. 

THE LIBERTY OF CHRIST'S CHURCH 

In the fear of God. 
In the limits of Love. 

THE URGENCY OF CHRIST'S CHURCH 

To evangelize the world. 
To edify the Believer. 

- TO GOD ALONE BE THE GLORY - 




14 dmoonatrMt 
bcmon, MA 02106 



2002 YEARBOOK 



C 



C 



The 

CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATIONAL 

CHRISTIAN CONFERENCE 



DIRECTORY 

of the 
Officers, Representatives, Committees, 
Associations, Ministers and Churches 



REPORTS 

for the 
Year Ending December 3 1 , 200 1 



Note: 

For e-mail addresses and websites 

of individual members and churches^ 

see the Conference web site (www.ccccusa.org) 



The YEARBOOK is published annually and is sent to each member Church, creden- 
tialed member, Individual Lay Member, and Conference Benefactor. 

Please send corrections and changes of information for the 2003 edition to the 
Conference Office at the address below. 



Additional copies are available, at $7.50 per copy plus postage. Contact the Confer- 
ence Office at the address below if you are interested in more copies. 



COOC 

7582 Currell Blvd., Suite #108, St. Paul, MN 55 125 

Tel: 651-739-1474; Fax: 651-739-0750 

E-mail: 

crchristensen@ccccusa. org 

dmjohnson@ccccusa. org 

gmbrimmer@ccccusa. org 

Internet: www.ccccusa.org 



A 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



CONFERENCE LEADERSHIP 

From the Conference President 4 

Past Conference Ministers and Presidents 5 

Officers 6 

Board of Directors 7 

Organization Chart 8 

Committee Members 1 

Area Representatives and Regional Fellowships Map 16 

Regional Minister and Area Representatives 17 

Regional Fellowships 1 9 

CONFERENCE MEMBERS AND ASSOCIATES 

Ordained Ministers 2 5 

Ordained Ministers (Associate Members) 4 1 

Licensed Ministers 43 

Licensed Ministers (Associate Members) 48 

Commissioned Christian Workers 49 

Students Under Conference Care 5 1 

Lay Preachers 5 2 

Lay Members from Non-Member Churches 5 3 

Members Serving Overseas 54 

Missionaries U.S./Canada 54 

Armed Forces Chaplains 5 5 

Armed Forces Reserve Chaplains 56 

Industrial & Institutional Chaplains 5 6 

CONFERENCE REPORTS 

Reports from Member Churches 5 7 

Summary of Church Information 99 

Giving from Non-Member Churches 99 

Giving from Regional Fellowships 99 

2000 Financial Report 1 00 

2002 Budget 1 1 1 

Conference Benefactors 1 1 2 

CONFERENCE STATEMENTS/DOCUMENTS 

Constitution and By-Laws I 15 

The Nature of our Fellowship 127 

Code of Ethics for Ministers 128 

Code of Ethics for Churches 129 

Statement on Ministerial Standing of Women 130 

Racial Reconciliation 1 3 1 

Statement Regarding the Charismatic Movement 133 

Divorce and the Ministry 134 

Homosexuals and the Christian Fellowship 138 

Statement on Abortion 1 39 

Statement on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide 141 

Statement on Pornography and Obscenity 144 

Other Available Position Papers 145 

CONFERENCE INFORMATION 

Annual Meetings 146 

Conference Services Offered 147 

FORESEE Publications Inside back cover 



From the 
Conference President 

I am privileged to minister in a part of our 
country that arguably celebrates, to a 
fault, freedom and rugged individualism. 
Sadly, more than a few people of our 
spiritually conservative way have, at 
times, also stressed these virtues to a 
fauh, often creating distance from others 
of like precious faith. Separated Chris- 
tians is an oxymoron. 

In the middle of a Scripture sandwich, the 
writer of Hebrews 10:25a puts forth this 
counsel as the standard and corrective: 
"Let us not give up meeting together, as 
some are in the habit of doing." 

What believers are to do when assembled together is at the top and bottom of 
the sandwich: "Let us consider how to spur one another on toward love and 
good deeds... Let us encourage one another." Hebrews 10:24 & 25b 

For 54 years the CCCC has been a home for Christians of conviction. You hold in 
your hands our statement of what it is that binds together people with separation 
tendencies: 1 ) Our Lord Jesus Christ as revealed in the Word of God; 2) A listing 
of people and churches who believe Hebrews 10:24 & 25; and 3) Our practice of 
practical faith and life together. 

I invite you to read these pages seeking to glean not only information, but our 
spirit. Better than words is what happens when we interact. If you haven't done 
so already, contact one of our Area Representatives or the home office to flesh 
out what you read. Best of all, why not come and meet many of us at the July 
Annual Meeting in Michigan. 

The CCCC is a nourishing sandwich. Come "dine" with us. 




Edward A. Whitman 



PAST CONFERENCE MINISTERS AND PRESIDENTS 

Executive Secretaries and Field Directors 

1948-1949 Dr.HilmerB.Sandine 
1 949- 1 95 1 Rev. Henry L. Schol 
1 952- 1 953 Rev Edward G. Smith 
1953-1955 Rev. Arthur A. Luther 
1955-1959 Dr. Henri KM. Pol 

Missionaries at Large 

1 959- 1 965 Dr. Robert B. Dempsey 
1 965- 1 967 Rev Richard O. Roberts 
1967-1973 Rev Samuel T.Hemberger 

Conference Ministers ' 

1 973- 1 974 Rev Willis E. Joiner 
\914-\911 Rev. J. Bruce Ostien 
1 977- 1 98 1 Rev Samuel T. Hemberger 

Past Conference Presidents 

1948-1949 Dr. H. Ellis Lininger 
1949-1950 Rev. Fred Williams 
1950-1953 Rev. Arthur A. Luther 
1 953- 1 956 Rev. Edward G. Smith 
1956-1959 Rev. Alfred Abrahamson 
1959-1960 Rev. George Kirgiss 
1960-1961 Dr. Henri Pol 
1961-1964 Dr. Lloyd R Dean 
1964-1967 Rev. Samuel T. Hemberger 
1967-1969 Dr. Raymond C. Ortlund 
1969-1972 Rev. Wayne Hamilton 
1972-1975 Rev. A. Barry Jones 
1975-1978 Dr. James H. Blackstonejr 
1 978- 1 98 1 Rev. George S. Buhl 
1 98 1 - 1 984 Rev. Bruce R. Brown 
1984-1986 Rev. Lynn E. Scovil 
1986-1987 Dr Graeme C. Smith 
1987-1990 Rev. Jay L. Warren 
1990-1993 Mr. William V. Nygren 
1993-1996 Rev. Donald A. Ehler 
1996-1999 Rev. Clarence J. Schultz 



CONFERENCE OFFICERS 



President 

Rev. Edward A. Whitman 

59 Province Rd 
BarringtonNH 03825 

Vice-President 

Rev. Larry Scovil 

317W40thSt 
ScottsbluffNE 69361 

Conference Minister 

Rev. Clifford R. Christensen 

457 Mary Street 
MaplewoodMN 55119 

Controller 

Mr. Orrin H. Bailey 

4260 East Lake Road 
Muskegon MI 49444 

Recording Secretary 
Rev. Peter Murdy 

4 Plympton St 
Middleboro MA 02346 



1999-2002Term 
(603)664-9340 



1999-2002 Term 
(308)632-4545 



2000-2003 Term 
(651)739-1474 



2000-2003 Term 
(231)733-4232 



2001-2004Term 
(508)947-1881 



Treasurer 

Rev. Tay Kersey 

8450 Eastwood Rd 
Moundsview MN 55112 



2001-2004Term 
(763)784-6482 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



1999-2002 Term 
Rev. George Allen 

1501 Euclid St, Steilacoom WA 983 88 
Rev. John Eklund 

1 3 Church Rd, Pomfret Ctr CT 06259 
Mr. Vern Fegler 

2 1 75 20th St, Gering NE 6934 1 
Rev. John Kimball 

3657 Carolina Rd, Suffolk VA 23434 



(253)582-8773 
(860)928-7381 
(308)436-5355 
(757)986-4096 



2000-2003 Term 
Rev. Don Eisenhauer 

207 Ivy Lane, Douglassville PA 1 95 1 8 
Mr. John R. Mitchell 

1 920 Bonnie View Dr, Royal Oak MI 48073 
Dr. K. Lawrence Stroble 

3534 Pamona Dr, Dayton OH 45440 
Mr.KenWitte 

41 N Whistler Ave, Freeport IL 61032 

2001-2004 Term 
Dr. Marvin L. Eyler 

1 200 Leonard Ave, Pasadena C A 9 1 1 07 
Mr. Jack Nygren 

349 Woodduck Circle, Woodbury MN 55 1 25 
Dr. Milton K. Reimer 

POBox212,FessendenND 58438 
Rev. J. Kirk van der Swaagh 

119 Morton St #4B, New YorkNY 10014 



(610)385-7551 
(248)288-0321 
(937)426-0814 
(815)235-8845 

(626)351-0508 
(651)731-2340 
(701)547-3534 
(212)691-1770 



CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATIONAL CHRISTIAN CONFERENCE 



MEMBERS OFTHE CONFERENCE 

Thru the Annual Meeting delegates 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS (18 24) 



EXECUTIVE COMM. 



Pres C Min Treas. 

V Pres Ctir Sec'y 

Elected in above 3 groups for 3 
year terms. 



CORP. DIRECTORS 



12-24 members. 

Elected for staggered 3 year 
terms, at least 4 per year. 



Past Presidents' 
Advisory Committee 



President 



Conference Minister 



CONFERENCE ADMINISTRATION 

Director, Conference Administration 
President, ex-officio 



FINANCE (& AUDITING) 

Chairman, Bd. Appt. 
3 elected (3 yrs) + Ctir. & Treas. 



NOMINATING 

Chairman, Bd. Appt. 
3 elected (3 yrs) + 2 Bd. Appt. (1 yr) 



CONSTITUTION STUDY 

Chairman, Bd. Appt. 

3 elected (3 yrs) 

Chairman serves as parliamentarian 



ADMINISTRATION COUNCIL 

Executive Committee 

plus 

3 Chairmen above 



/•x//x////////x////x////vyx//x////// ; 



SERVICES COUNCIL 

Chairmen of committees 

plus 

Dir. of Conf. Svcs and Conf. Minister 



Office Staff 



CONFERENCE SERVICES 

Director, Conference Sen/ices 
CM Appt. 



ANNUAL MTG PLANNING 

Chairman, Bd Appt. 

Includes: 

Program, Children, Youth, Women, 

Registrar, Treasurer, & Conf. Minister 

All Board appointments (1 yr), except officers. 



CONFERENCE EDUCATION 

Chairman, Bd. Appt. 
3 elected (3 yrs) + Historian 



CREDENTIALS 

Chairman, Bd. Appt. 
5 Bd. appts (3 yrs) + CMin.+ End. Agt. 



EDITORIAL (COMMUNICATIONS) 

Chairman, Bd. Appt. 
3 elected (3 yrs) + Editor & Media Mgr 



FORESEE PUBLICATIONS 

Chairman, Bd. Appt. 
CM appts 3 (3 yrs) + Ctir. & Treas. 



LAY MINISTRY 

Chairman, Bd. Appt. 
3 elected (3 yrs) 



MINISTRY 

Chairman, Bd. Appt. 
3 elected (3 yrs) 



SPIRITUAL LIFE 

Chairman, Bd. Appt. 
3 elected (3 yrs) 



WOMEN'S MINISTRIES 

President (chair) elected by women 
3-6 elected (3 yrs) 



ORGANIZATION CHART 



CONFERENCE OUTREACH 

Director, Conference Outreach 
CM Appt. 



CONF. REGIONAL ACTIVITIES 

Director, Conf. Regional Activities 
CM Appt. 



CONFERENCE GROWTH 

Chairnnan, Bd. Appt. 
3 elected (3 yrs) 



AREA REPRESENTATIVES 

Chairmen, CM Appt. 
CMappts(lyr) 



MISSIONS 

Chairman, Bd. Appt. 
3-6 elected (3 yrs) 



REGIONAL FELLOWSHIPS 

Self-government 



FRATERNAL RELATIONS 

Chairman, Bd. Appt. 
3 elected (3 yrs) 



MICRONESIA MINISTRIES 

Chairman, Bd. Appt. 
3-6 Appt. by Bd of Directors 



, OTHER AREAS OF SERVICE , 

"I Chairmen, Bd. Appt. I 

I Dir CO & CM appts as needed ' 



OUTREACH COUNCIL 

Chairmen of committees 

plus 

Dir Conf. Outreach and Conf. Minister 



COMMITTEE MEMBERS 

(^denotes committee chairman) 



DEPARTMENT OF CONFERENCE ADMINISTRATION 
Rev. Edward A.Whitman - Director (ex-olficio) 
59 Province Rd, Barrington NH 03825 



(603)664-9340 



CONSTITUTION STUDY 
Steven Felker 

PC Box 8, Southfield MA 01259 
Ken Carr 

322 E Union Ave, Wheaton IL 60 1 87 
*Richard Chaffee 

2366 Otisco Valley Rd, Marietta NY 1 3 1 1 



(413)229-8109 

2002 
(630)462-0878 

2003 
(315)636-8843 

2004 



FINANCE 

*Jack Nygren 

349 Woodduck Circle, Woodbury MN 55 125 
Don Myers 

3 1 9 E Main St, Greenville OH 4533 1 
Don Bishel 

7299 Road 29, Madera CA 93637 
Tay Kersey (Treas) 

8450 Eastwood Rd, Moundsview MN 55112 
Orrin Bailey (Controller) 

4260 East Lake Rd, Muskegon MI 49444 



(651)731-2340 

2002 
(937)548-7543 

2003 
(209)264-7724 

2004 
(763)784-6482 

Ex-officio2001 

(231)733-4232 

Ex-officio2003 



NOMINATING 
*Max Vague 

3812 Nutmeg Way, Oceanside CA 92057 
Steve Carmany 

26677 SR 58, Wellington OH 44090 
Pam McPherson 

2757 Horton Street, N Dighton MA 02764 
Karen Sloat 

P O Drawer 000, Indio C A 92202 
Jay Warren 

2 1 0092 Wildcat Dr, Gering NE 6934 1 



(760)729-2331 

2002 
(440)647-4847 

2003 
(508)252-9824 

2004 

(760)772-8718 

Apptd2002 

(308)632-2543 

Apptd2002 



10 



DEPARTMENT OF CONFERENCE SERVICES 
Rev. Lester G. Felker - Director (Apptd) 
1 1 166 E Baltic Dr, Aurora CO 80014 



(303)696-1028 



CONFERENCEEDUCATION 
Edward Gospodinsky 

1 63 Center Ave, Plymouth PA 1 865 1 
*David Ballou 

330 Willow Tree Rd, Milton NY 12547 
Robert E. Davis 

1 Crescent St, Millers Falls MA 1 349 
Milton K. Reimer (Historian) 

PO Box 2 1 2, Fessenden ND 58438 



(570)779-1451 

2002 
(845)795-2908 

2003 
(413)659-3430 

2(m 

(701)547-3534 

Ex-officio2002 



CREDENTIALS 
Steve Gammon 

35 Currier Ave, Peterborough NH 03458 
Lloyd Dean 

270 Cindy Ann Dr, E Greenwich RI 028 1 8 
*Clarence Schultz 

1 195 Manning Ave N, Lake Elmo MN 55042 
Nicholas Granitsas 

68 Eustis St, Revere MA 02 1 5 1 
Edward Whitman 

59 Province St, Barrington NH 03825 
Clifford Christensen (Conference Minister) 

457 S Mary St., MaplewoodMN 551 19 
Jerry Malone (Endorsing Agent) 

724 W 1 7th Ave, Spokane WA 99203 



(603)924-6438 

2002 
(401)885-6037 

2003 
(651)436-6021 

2003 
(781)284-4158 

2004 
(603)664-9340 

2004 

(651)739-1474 

Ex-officio 

(509)235-4841 

Ex-officio 



EDITORIAL 
Wesley Blood 

4207 Lowe Rd, Toledo OH 43612 
George Allen 

310 Pierce St, Steilacoom WA 98388 
*John Fanella 

937 Burtonwood Circle, Charlotte NC 282 12 
Bryan Burrell (Media Manager) 

468 Mountain View Ave, Valley Cottage NY 1 0989 
Bill Nygren (Editor) 

215 N Power #345, Mesa AZ 85205 



(734)856-2312 

2002 

(253)582-8773 

2003 

(704)887-3664 

20(H 

(845)358-8429 

Ex-officio 2002 

(480)857-8312 

Ex-officio 2003 



11 



DEPARTMENT OF CONFERENCE SERVICES continued 



FORESEE PUBLICATIONS 
Pam Faessler 

1 940 Lockaven Alcove, Woodbury MN 55125 
Carol Christensen 

457 Mary St, Maplewood MN 55 1 1 9 
*Gay Walker 

628 Pearse Rd, Niskayuna NY 1 2309 
Tay Kersey (Treasurer) 

8450 Eastwood Rd, Moundsview MN 55 1 12 
Orrin Bailey (Controller) 

4269 East Lake Road, Muskegon MI 49444 



(651)731-3696 

Apptd2002 

(651)735-8898 

Apptd2003 

(518)346-3538 

Apptd2004 

(763)784-6482 

Ex-officio2001 

(231)733-4232 

Ex-officio2003 



LAY MINISTRY 
* Alvin Helms 

2736 Cambridge Dr, Steilacoom WA 98388 
Lisa Mcintosh 

60 Hillsdale, Bloomfield MI 48302 
J. Kirk van der Swaagh 

119MortonSt#4B,NewYorkNY 10014 



(253)584-4623 
2002 

(248)332-4809 
2003 

(212)691-1770 
2004 



MINISTRY 
*Stephen Burkett 

1 7 Princeton St, N Chelmsford MA 1 863 
Charles Cohagen 

829 Whites Rd, Kalamazoo MI 49008 
CUnt Bahrenburg 

995 Lehman Rd, Warfordsburg PA 1 7267 



(978)251-1261 

2002 
(616)382-6268 

2003 
(717)294-3940 

2004 



MINISTRY - BENEFITS OVERSIGHT 
* Stephen Burkett 

1 7 Princeton St, N Chelmsford MA 1 863 
Orrin Bailey 

4260 East Lake Rd, Muskegon MI 49444 
Nick Granitsas 

68 Eustis St, Revere MA 02 1 5 1 
Bill Nygren 

215 N Power #345, Mesa AZ 85205 
Jack Nygren 

349 Woodduck Circle, Woodbury MN 55 125 
Jay Warren 

2 1 0092 Wildcat Dr, Gering NE 6934 1 



(978)251-1261 

Ex-officio 
(231)733-4232 

Apptd2002 
(781)284-4158 

Apptd2002 
(480)857-8312 

Apptd2002 
(651)731-2340 

Apptd2002 
(308)632-2543 

Apptd2002 



12 



DEPARTMENT OF CONFERENCE SERVICES continued 



PROGRAM 

Don Ehler (Coordinator) 

Box 389, Hillsboro WI 54634 
*Larry Wood (Local Arrangements Chairman) 

1 852 Catalpa, Berkley MI 48072 
Gary Evans 

4072 Clifton Ridge, Highland MI 48357 
KenMcGarvey 

8236 M-32W, Atlanta MI 49709 
Jeff Meyers 

P O Box 207, Cedarville MI 497 1 9 
John Kimball (03 Local Arrangements Chairman) 

3657 Carolina Rd, Suffolk VA 23434 
Jack & Marilyn Nygren (Registrars) 

349 Woodduck Circle, Woodbury MN 55 125 
CHILDREN'S 
Danielle Willcock 

1820 Torquay Ave, Royal Oak MI 48073 
YOUTH 
David Eikenberry 

4862 Lake Harbor, Muskegon MI 4944 1 



(608)489-2492 

Ex-officio 
(248)549-5452 

Apptd2002 
(248)887-1515 

Apptd 2002 
(989)785-2062 

Apptd 2002 
(906)484-3638 

Apptd 2002 
(757)986-4096 

Apptd 2002 

(651)731-2340 

Ex-officio 2002 

(248)435-4445 

Apptd 2002 

(231)773-5300 

Apptd 2002 



SPIRITUAL LIFE 
Jerry Johnson 

393 N Lake Ave, Pasadena CA 9 1 1 1 
*RayOrtlund 

601 Lido Park Dr 6E, Newport Beach CA 92663 
David Bryant 

PC Box 770, New Providence NJ 07974 



(626)814-4884 
2002 

(949)756-1313 
2003 

(908)771-0146 
2004 



WOMEN'S MINISTRIES 
*LizEklund 

59 Bradley Rd,Pomft-etCtrCT 06259 
KimGardeU 

PC Box 2580, Renton WA 98056 
Kris Scovil 

3 17 W 40th St, Scottsbluff NE 69361 
Sue Witte 

41 N Whistler Ave, Freeport IL 61032 
Kathryn Kimball 

3657 Carolina Rd, Suffolk VA 23434 
Sandy Stewart 

535 6th St #208, Avon MN 563 10 



(860)963-1030 

2002 
(425)227-4833 

2002 
(308)632-3860 

2003 
(815)235-8845 

2003 
(757)986-2810 

20(H 
(320)356-1091 

20(M 



13 



DEPARTMENT OF CONFERENCE OUTREACH 



Rev. A. Barry Jones - Director (Apptd) 
3760 Catalina Dr, Carlsbad CA 92008 



(760)729-0114 



CONFERENCE GROWTH 
*Ron Hamilton 

3075 Leyland Trail, Woodbury MN 55 125 
Robert Strauch 

PC Box 368, Flagler CO 808 1 5 
Gerald Haglund 

1 3 5 Connecticut Ave, Jamestown NY 14701 



(651)739-1427 

2002 
(719)765-4503 

2003 
(716)484-6664 

2004 



CHURCH MULTIPUCAnON 
*Ron Hamilton 

3075 LeylandTrail, Woodbury MN55125 
Jim Hale 

414Goode St, Burnt Hills NY 12027 
Paul McPheeters 

133 Floral Ave, Maiden MA 02 148 
Stephen Sloat 

PC Drawer 000, Indio C A 92202 
George Wood 

536 Fremont, S Pasadena CA 91030 



(651)739-1427 

Apptd 
(518)583-3172 

Apptd 
(781)321-1828 

Apptd 
(760)347-1229 

Apptd 
(626)441-1243 

Apptd 



FRATERNAL RELATIONS 

Richard Freeman (732)793-6028 

14 Camden Ave, Lavallette NJ 07835 2002 

Ernest Richter (760)753-9520 

706 Teaberry St, Encinitas CA 92024 2003 

*Ron Sylvester (518)399-3151 

1 4 High Mills Scotchbush Rd, Burnt Hills NY 1 2029 20(M 

J. Kirk van der Swaagh (NPRC) (212)691-1770 

1 1 9 Morton St #4B, New York NY 1 00 1 4 Ex-officio 



14 



DEPARTMENT OF CONFERENCE OUTREACH (continued) 



MISSIONS 
John Bernard 

220 Whitegrove Dr, Fort Mill SC 297 1 5 
*John Kimball 

3657 Carolina Rd, Suffolk VA 23434 
Philip Corr 

830 Ponderosa Place, Eaton CO 80615 
MarvEyler 

1 200 Leonard Ave, Pasadena C A 9 1 1 07 
Clair Longuevan 

2208 Dakota Dr, Grand Junction CO 8 1 503 
Larry Keyes 

PO Box 36900, Colorado Springs CO 80936 



(704)357-3355 

2002 
(757)986-4096 

2002 
(970)454-2481 

2003 
(626)351-0508 

2003 
(970)243-5949 

2004 
(719)592-9292 

2004 



MICRONESIA 
*George Allen 

1501 Euclid St, SteilacoomWA 98388 
GaryGardeU 

PO Box 2580, Renton WA 98059 
Larry Scovil 

317W40thSt,ScottsbluffNE 69361 
Dick Trosak 

1656 Rue De Valle, San Marcos CA 92069 
Max Vague 

3812 Nutmeg Way, Oceanside CA 92057 



(253)582-8773 

Apptd 
(425)226-3590 

Apptd 
(308)632-4545 

Apptd 
(760)744-5052 

Apptd 
(760)729-2331 

Apptd 



15 




16 



REGIONAL MINISTER 

NORTHEAST 

Rev. Carlton K.Walker (518)346-3538 

628 Pearse Road, Niskayuna NY 1 2309 

AREA REPRESENTATIVES 

(*denotes chairman) 

MAINE 

Rev. M. Lester Strout (207)688-4846 

461 ElmwoodRd,PownalME 04069 

NEWHAMPSHIRE 

*Rev. Steve Gammon (Currently active duty Chaplain) (603)924-6438 

35 Currier Ave, Peterborough NH 03458 
Rev. Stephen Sebastian (Acting) (603)878-1327 

1 50 Main St, New Ipswich NH 0307 1 

CENTRALNEWENGLAND 

Rev. Paul McPheeters (781)321-1828 

133 Floral Ave, Maiden MA 02 1 48 

SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND 

Rev. James Beesley (860)423-7197 

64 Oakwood Dr, Windham CT 06280 

EASTERN NEW YORK AND VERMONT 

Rev. Tom Bridgman (413)443-2575 

1053 Williams St, Pittsfield MA 01201 

GREATER NEW YORK CITY AND NEW JERSEY 

Rev. Robert G. Hall (718)220-3652 

2232 Andrews Avenue, Bronx NY 10453 

WESTERN NEW YORK AND PENNSYLVANIA 

Rev. Gerald Haglund (716)664-6577 

135 Connecticut Ave, Jamestown NY 14701 

EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Dr. Edward Gospodinsky (570)779-1451 

163 Center Ave, Plymouth PA 18651 

WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 

Rev. Maurice Smith (724)452-8 1 20 

896 Sunset Circle, Cranberry Township PA 1 6066 

MID ATLANTIC 

Rev. David B. Gilbert (336)584-8939 

PC Box 127, Altamahaw NC 27202 



17 



AREA REPRESENTATIVES continued 



EASTERN OHIO 
Rev. Peter Parry 

17807 Rosecliff Rd, Cleveland OH 44119 

INDIANA AND WESTERN OHIO 
Rev. Don Myers 

3 19 E Main St, Greenville OH 4533 1 

MICHIGAN 
Rev. Larry Wood 

1 852 Catalpa, Berkley MI 48072 

WISCONSIN 
Rev. Steven Scharf 

W1365 Center Drive, Brownsville WI 53006 

NORTHERN ILLINOIS 
Rev. Robert Schroeder 

27953 S 88th Ave, Peotone IL 60468 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS, MISSOURI 

Vacant 

SOUTHEAST ANDTEXAS 
Rev. Jerry Helton 

1 744 Earl Patterson Rd, Blairsville GA 305 12 

UPPERMIDWEST 
Rev. Ron Stewart 

535 6th St #208, Avon MN 56310 

CENTRAL MIDWEST 
Rev. Steward Smith 

POBox336,MilfordKS66514 

GREAT PLAINS 
Dr. Milton Reimer 

POBox212,FessendenND 58438 

ROCKYMOUNTAINS 
Rev. Phil Corr 

830 Ponderosa Place, Eaton CO 806 1 5 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST 
Rev. Gary Gardell 

PO Box 2580, RentonWA 98056 

PACIFIC SOUTHWEST 
Dr.MarvEyler 

1200 Leonard Ave, Pasadena CA 91 107 

18 



(216)692-1733 



(937)548-7543 



(248)549-5452 



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REGIONAL FELLOWSHIPS 

MAINE ASSOCIATION OF 
CONGREGATIONAL CHRISTIAN AND COMMUNITY CHURCHES 
Moderator: Rev. Scott Cleveland 

56 1 S Main St, Brewer ME 044 1 2 
Vice-Moderator: Rev. John Pokrifka 

9 Barber Rd, Randolph ME 04346 
Clerk: Susan T Chilton 

RR2 Box 407, Gardiner ME 04345 
Treasurer: Mrs. Loma Hutchinson 

HCR 67 Box 540, Dixfield ME 04224 
Missions Coordinator: N/A 
Committees: 

Credentials/Placement: Rev. Scott Cleveland, Alan Tacheny, Rev. Phil Webster 
Publications: Mrs. Mary Pearson, Mrs. Marion Foss, Mrs. Susan Chilton 
Home Missions/Church Outreach: Mr. Andy Goodwin, Rev. Warren 

Feustal, Rev. Bob Egan 
Women's Activities: Mrs. Faye Pokrifka, Mrs. Betty Strout, Mrs. Ursula 

Thompson 

NEW ENGLAND 
CONGREGATIONAL CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 
Moderator: Rev. Stephen L. Burkett 

1 7 Princeton St, N Chelmsford MA 1 863 
Vice-Moderator: Rev. J Loring Carpenter 

58 Country Hill Lane, Haverhill MA 01 832 
Scribe: Rev. Andrew Gosnell 

773 Main St Box 3 13, Ashby MA 01431 
Treasurer: Rev. Stephen Sebastian 

1 50 Main St, New Ipswich NH 0307 1 
Editor: Rev. Peter Murdy 

6 Plympton St, Middleboro MA 02346 
Missions Coordinator: Rev. Timothy Dubeau 

244 Hartford Rd, Salem CT 06420 



19 



REGIONAL FELLOWSHIPS continued 

GREATER HUDSON VALLEY CONGREGATIONAL FELLOWSHIP 
Moderator: Rev. Harry Snider 

Box 394, Speculator NY 12164 
Vice-Moderator: Rev. John Cunningham 

28 Gale Ave, Pittsfield MA 1 20 1 
Secretary: Rev. Richard Chaffee 

23660tisco Valley Rd, Marietta NY 13110 
Treasurer: Rev. Jim Willard 

35 Howe Rd., Berkshire NY 13736 
Editor: Rev. Douglas Weeks 

149 Hopper Rd, Syracuse NY 1 3207 
Missions Coordinator: Mr. Mo Hale 

3409 Ridge Rd, Scotia NY 12302 

THE CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATIONAL COMMUNITY CHURCHES 
OF WESTERN NEWYORKAND PENNSYLVANIA 
Moderator: Mr. Richard HamUton 

PO Box 86, Stockton NY 14784 
Vice-Moderator: Lee O'Brien 

2886 Scott Hill Rd, Kennedy NY 14747 
Secretary-Treasurer: Mrs. Mickey Hamilton 

PO Box 86, Stockton NY 14784 
Assistant Secretary-Treasurer & Missions Coord.: Mrs. Dorothy Hamilton 

10GreenSt.,Lakewood,NY 14750 
Committees: 

Youth: Ben & Jamie Hedman; Todd Venman; Ernest Wiltsie 
Children's Committee: Sharon Carlson; Carol O'Brien; Jean Vanstrom 
Men's Activities: Lee O'Brien; Gordon Spiller; Derek Yoder 
Women's Activities: Marilyn Lewis; Mary Alice Lundmark; Nettie Swart 
Nominating: Charles Taylor; Carol Shay; Gerald Haglund 
Constitution Study: Gordon Anderson; Richard Hamilton; Eugene VanDette 
Fraternal Relations: Rev. Gerald Haglund 
Missions Mobilizer: Dorothy Hamilton 

EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA CONGREGATIONAL FELLOWSHIP 
President: Dr. Edward Gospodinsky 

163 CenterAve., Plymouth PA 18651 
Vice-President: Rev. Eldon Smith 

1 7 1 Church Rd, Telford PA 1 8969 
Secretary: Rev. Mrs. Sunny Stock 

572 Berne Dr, Schuylkill Haven PA 1 7972 
Treasurer: Dr. Donald Eisenhauer 

207IvyLane,DouglassvillePA 19518 
Missions Coordinator: N/A 

20 



REGIONAL FELLOWSHIPS continued 

MID-ATLANTIC CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATIONAL 
CHRISTIAN REGIONAL FELLOWSHIP 
Moderator: Rev. Rob Witham 

27 1 7 Tavern Way, Glen Allen VA 23060 
Vice-Moderator: Rev. John Kimball 

3757 Carolina Rd, Suffolk VA 23434 
Scribe: Mrs. Becky Umphlett 

1428 Greenway Rd., Suffolk VA 23438 
Treasurer: Mr. Roland Rose 

3 West East St, Delmar, MD 2 1 875 
Acting Missions Coordinator: Rev. John Kimball 

OHIO ASSOCIATION OF THE CONSERVATIVE 
CONGREGATIONAL CHRISTIAN CHURCHES 
Moderator: Rev. Peter Parry 

1 7807 Rosecliff Road, Cleveland OH 441 19 
Vice-Moderator: Rev. Gary Eno 

85 Jefferson Dr, Caldwell OH 43724 
Secretary: Rev. Tom Keller 

6828 Firestone Road, Spencer OH 44275 
Treasurer: Rev. Stephen Carmany 

26500 St Rt 58, Wellington OH 44090 
Missions Coordinator: Rev. Franklin Shannon 

8883 Asbury Rd, Ravenna OH 44266 

CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATIONAL CHRISTIAN 
CONFERENCE OF MICHIGAN 
Moderator: Rev. Ken McGarvey 

8236 M-32 West, Atlanta MI 48709 
Vice-Moderator: Mr. Nicholas Ruffer 

2520 Harvey Lake Rd, Highland MI 48357 
Scribe: Mrs. Wanda Evans 

4072 Clifton Rd, Highland MI 48537 
Treasurer: Rev. Tom Maher 

RO. Box 8, Honor MI 49640 



21 



REGIONAL FELLOWSHIPS continued 

THE CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATIONAL 
WISCONSIN FELLOWSHIP OF 
CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATIONAL CHRISTIAN CHURCHES 
President: Rev. Philip Allen, Jr. 

1 645 White Avenue, Beloit WI 535 1 1 
Vice-President: Rev. Carl Rogers 

Box 252, Wilton WI 54670 
Secretary: Rev. Marc Axelrod 

Box 134, Potter WI 54160 
Treasurer: Rev. David Flegel 

57 ION 33rd St, Milwaukee WI 53209 
Missions Coordinator: Rev. Carl Rogers 

Box 252, Wilton WI 54670 

NORTHERN ILLINOIS REGIONAL FELLOWSHIP OF THE C.C.C.C. 
Moderator: Rev. Tom Curry 

330 N Linden Dr, Roundlake Pk IL 60073 
Vice-Moderator: Rev. Mark ATolodziecki 

PO Box 6, Seward IL 6 1077 
Secretary: Rev. Robert Schroeder 

27953 S 88th Ave, Peotone IL 60468 
Treasurer: Robert Weseloh 

12555 Highland Ave, Blue Island IL 60406 
Missions Coordinator: Vacant 

UPPER MIDWEST CONGREGATIONAL FELLOWSHIP 
Moderator: Rev. Randy Melhus 

645 1 Long Lake Rd, Makinen MN 55763 
Vice-Moderator: Rev. Joan TyvoU 

36 South Ave East, Clear Lake WI 54005 
Secretary: Mr. Dick Lohry 

9181 Pihlaja Rd, Angora MN 55703 
Treasurer: Rev. Garrick Schick 

9886 20th St, Holdingford MN 56340 
Editor: Vacant 
Registrar: Rev. Jerry Platz 

PO Box 87, Mantorville MN 55955 

THE CENTRAL MIDWEST CONGREGATIONAL FELLOWSHIP 
Moderator: Vacant 

Scribe & Acting Treasurer: Rev. Steward Smith, 

308 Tenth St., RO. Box 336, Milford, KS 665 14 



22 



REGIONAL FELLOWSHIPS continued 

GREAT PLAINS CONGREGATIONAL FELLOWSHIP 
Moderator: Rev. MOt Reimer 

PO Box 212, Fessenden ND 58488 
Vice-Moderator: Rev. Corey Warner 

212 Dakota St, MottND 58646 
Secretary: Rev. Rick Stevens 

940 5th St. W., Dickinson ND 58601 
Treasurer: Mr. Corey Warner 

212 Dakota St, MottND 58646 
Missions Coordinator: Mr. and Mrs. Allen Kohl, 

200 6thAve.NE., Elgin, ND 58533 
Committees: 

Credentials/Plcmnt: Rev. Bob Baker; Rev. Bill Bradley; Rev. Milt Reimer 
Nominating: Rev. Milt Reimer 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN CONGREGATIONAL FELLOWSHIP 
Moderator: Rev. Bob Strauch 

P O Box 368, Flagler CO 808 1 5 
Vice-Moderator: Rev. Robert Tolson 

720 Deuel St, Ft Morgan CO 80701 
Secretary: Rev. Robert Tolson 

720 Deuel St, Ft Morgan CO 80701 
Treasurer: Rev. Robert Tolson 

720 Deuel St, Ft Morgan CO 8070 1 - 
Missions Coordinator: Rev. Phil Corr 

830 Ponderosa Place, Eaton CO 806 1 5 
Barnabas Missions Coordinator: Rev. Les Felker 

1 1 1 66 E Baltic Dr, Aurora CO 800 1 4 
Events Coordinator: Rev. Ken Fulton 

433 N. Wyndham Ave., Greeley CO 80634 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST FELLOWSHIP OF THE CCCC 

Inactive 

PACIFIC SOUTHWEST CONFERENCE OF THE CCCC 
Moderator: Rev. Ernie Richter 

706 Teaberry St, Encinitas C A 92024 
Vice-Moderator: (Vacant) 
Secretary: Rev. Roger K. Lark 

42 1 Dusk Lane, Oceanside C A 92056 
Treasurer: Rev. Max Vague 

3 1 75 Harding St, Carlsbad C A 92008 
Missions Coordinator: (Vacant) 



23 



REGIONAL FELLOWSHIPS continued 

Other Missions Coordinators: 

New York City and New Jersey: 
Zoraida Bennett 

2348 University Ave., #4S, Bronx NY 10468 
Southeast and Texas: 
Gerald F.Wilson 

4629 S Drive W., Fort Worth TX 76132-2319 



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LAY MEMBERS FROM NON-MEMBER CHURCHES 

91 Sunset Lake Rd, Benson VT 05743 



Farwell, George 

Gregerson, Gene & Lois 
Griffith, Daniel 

Hamilton, Mrs Dorothy 

Kurtz, Rev James E 

Mathewson, Mr Robert A 
Maurer, Raetta 
McRoberts, Mr John G 

Pinke, Doris 

Shannon, Kathy 

Tatem, Stewart & Gladys 

Watts, Mrs Lois W 
WilHams, Mr David A 



Box 384, LaPointe WI 54850 
24 Mumford Hill, Sutton MA 01590 

15 Green St, Lakewood NY 14750 

Box 239, Peru IL 61354 

5 Northwest Drive, Somers CT 06071 

913 S Prospect St, Marion OH 43302 

206 E Sixth Street, Mishawaka IN 46544 

50 Liberty Way #1, Palm Harbor PL 34684 

1709 W Phoenix PI, Broken Arrow OK 7401 1 

Box 205, Eastford CT 06242 

20 Lamplighter Lane, S Easton MA 02375 
3616 Bellaire Dr N, Fort Worth TX 76109 



Zeyl, Donald & Judith 



50 Parkwood Drive, Kingston RI 02881 



53 



David A. Baer 
Alden Barrows 
Dayna Ann Blair 
Mark F. Blair 
Bruce R. Brown 
Dean W. Carlson 
Brian Eckheart 
Jeleta Eckheart 
Lion S. Erwteman 
Jeffrey F. Evans 
Gilberto Filsinger 
Helen Filsinger 
Christine M. Gilmore 
Timothy S. Gilmore 
Jeffery S. Griffith 
Kaarina A. Ham 
Robert Hill 

Theodore W. Holzmann 
David J. Krason 
James F. Longhurst 
Eduard Moehl 
Diane Moore 
Ann Olsson 
Karl Olsson 
Lillian R. Pica 
Bruce A. Pinke 
John L. Robertson 
Karen C. Robertson 
*Anita Schiro 
*Blain Schiro 
*Dieter A. Schmidt 
Craig Soderberg 
Bruce Tanner 
Sandra Tanner 
Timothy Tiner 
Leslie Van Vorst 
Carolyn Waltz 
Marilyn Wilber 
Robert H. Wilber 
Dayna Wutke 



MEMBERS SERVING OVERSEAS 

(* on furlough) 
Costa Rica 
Brazil 
Kazakhstan 
Kazakhstan 
United Kingdom 
South Africa 
United Kingdom 
United Kingdom 
The Netherlands 
Honduras 
Brazil 
Brazil 
East Africa 
East Africa 
Czech Republic 
Russia 



Greece 

Germany 

Switzerland 

France 

Germany 

Philippines 

Haiti 

Haiti 

Italy 

West Africa 

Malaysia 

Malaysia 

Norwood MN 

Norwood MN 

Pittsfield MA 

Philippines 

Romania 

Romania 

Austria 

Australia 

Colombia 

Chuuk Micronesia 

Chunk Micronesia 

Central America 



Seminario ESEPA 

Fellowship IntT Missions 

Evang Christian Seminary 

Evang Christian Seminary 

Global Outreach Mission 

OC International 

Frontiers 

Frontiers 

Messianic Rabbi, Beth Yeshua 

Union Christian Church 

Fellowship of Int'l Mission 

Fellowship of Int'l Mission 

Wycliffe Bible Translators 

Wycliffe Bible Translators 

TEAM 

Youth for Christ 

Greek Bible Institute 

TEAM Church Planter 

BEE International 

Crossroads Evangelical Ch 

OC International 

Wycliffe Bible Translators 

Quisqueya Chapel 

Quisqueya Chapel 

WEC International 

WEC International 

NICS 

NICS 

YWAM 

YWAM 

Overseers Miss. Fellowship 

Wycliffe Bible Translators 

Tanner Romania Mission 

Tanner Romania Mission 

World Missions Fellowship 

Fellowship of Cong Churches 

Wycliffe Bible Translators 

Fraternal Worker 

Fraternal Worker 

Global Outreach 



MEMBER MISSIONARIES BASED IN THE USA & CANADA 



Anne V Adamson 
Joel W Adamson 
David Benson 
John G. Bernard 
David Bryant 
Ralph Camp 
Patrick V. Chiles 
Noel Churchman 
Hurbert Clevenger 
Malcolm Collins 
Larry A. Correll 
Robert Culver 
Dan Curran 
de Souza, Francisco 
Donald Dewing 
Wayne Earl 



Laguna Hills CA 
Laguna Hills CA 
Santa Barbara CA 
Fort Mill SC 
New Providence NJ 
Lemoore CA 
Oceanside CA 
Kitchener Canada 
Carmel IN 
Pasadena CA 
Beloit WI 
Decatur GA 
Martinez CA 
Allentown PA 
Crandon WI 
Williamstown MA 

54 



Frontiers 
Frontiers 
Russia for Christ 
United World Mission 
Concerts of Prayer Int'l 
Lemoore Fellowship House 
Fraternal Worker 
Christian Horizons 
OMS International Inc 
Africa Inland Mission 
Timothy Ministries 
Interface Ministries 
Campus Crusade for Christ 
Fellowship Int'l Missions 
Midwest Indian Mission 
Christian Associates Int'l 



MEMBER MISSIONARIES BASED IN THE USA & CANADA continued 



John Erwin 
Marvin Eyler 
Clinton P. Goddard 
Martin Granger 
Michael J. Greene 
Olan Hendrix 
Karl Holsberg 
David L. Johnston 
A. Barry Jones 
Lawrence Keyes 
Mark W. Kirgiss 
Manfred Kohl 
Robert Lanning 
Allen Little 
Clair L. Longuevan 
Kelly A. Madden 
Samuel Maihack 
Delbert C. Maxfield 
Toni L. Mc Andrew 
Edwin Messerschmidt 
Gregory Monaco 
Melody Monk 
Thomas Monk 
Ann Muller 
Jay Muller 
David O'Brien 
Raymond Ortlund 
William Pape 
Ralph Plumb 
Daniel Pulliam 
John A. Raymond 
Dennis Repko 
Stephen Richardson 
Roland L. Rose 
Moishe Rosen 
David V Schaffer 
David J. Seiver 
Franklin Shannon 
Paul Shaw 
Kenneth Shay 
Marion Shay 
Joe Shultz 
Edgar Silvoso 
Paul V. Sorrentino 
John StoU 
Erna L Webster 
Philip E. Webster 
Nancy Weigel 
Gary L. Wood 
Robert Xavier 
Tuvya Zaretsky 



Charlottesville VA 
Pasadena CA 
Pawleys Island SC 
Springfield VA 
Amherst MA 
Columbus OH 
Orlando PL 
Hamden CT 
Carlsbad CA 
Colorado Springs CO 
Detroit Lakes MN 
Nova Scotia Canada 
Bedford TX 
Marlette MI 
Grand Junction CO 
S Hamilton MA 
Odessa FL 
Bailey CO 
Virginia Beach VA 
Tuscaloosa AL 
Gary IE 

Middleboro MA 
Middleboro MA 
River Forest IE 
River Forest IE 
Belfast NY 
Newport Beach CA 
Ontario Canada 
Eos Angeles CA 
Forest Grove OR 
Fresno, CA 
Pasadena CA 
Orlando FE 
Delmar MD 
San Francisco CA 
Fairhaven MA 
Gumee IE 
Ravenna OH 
Clearwater FE 
Pasadena CA 
Pasadena CA 
Wichita KS 
San Jose CA 
S Deerfield MA 
Minneapolis MN 
Kennebunkport ME 
Kennebunkport ME 
Pasadena CA 
Dickinson ND 
Palmetto FE 
Eos Angeles CA 



Salvation Army 

OC International 

N Haiti Mission 

Faith in the Family Int'l 

InterVarsity 

Great Commission Ministries 

Good News Jail Ministries 

Yale University 

Morning Star Messengers 

OC International 

Young Eife 

Overseas Council 

Ripe Harvest Ministries 

Teen Ranch Inc 

Gospel Missionary Union 

Campus Crusade For Christ 

Navigators 

Denver Rescue Mission 

Eatin America Mission 

Skyland Oaks Retirement Ctr 

Youth for Christ 

EEO/Russia & Ukraine 

EEO/Russia & Ukraine 

Frontiers 

Frontiers 

SIM 

Renewal Ministries 

TEAM 

Union Rescue Mission 

Believer's Dynamics 

Hope Now for Youth 

Navigators 

Pioneers 

Tecate Mission 

Jews for Jesus 

Community Chaplain Service 

World In Need 

Cooperative Int'l Studies 

United World Mission 

Chinese Foundation Ministries 

Chinese Foundation Ministries 

Campus Living Association 

Harvest Evangelism Inc. 

InterVarsity 

ASK Inc 

Int'l Students Inc 

Int'l Students Inc 

LIFE Ministries 

New Hope Uganda Ministry 

Women Set Free Ministry 

Jews for Jesus 



ARMED FORCES CHAPLAINS (*denotes Area Representative) 



Lester Felker (Retired) 
Francis Fly (Retired) 
William Fretwell 
Stephen Gammon 



Aurora CO 
Newport News VA 
APO AE 
Peterborough NH 



U.S. Air Force 

U.S. An-ny 
U.S. Air Force 
U.S. Navy 



55 



ARMED FORCES CHAPLAINS continued 



Marc Gauthier 

James A. Hollywood 

Guy Lee 

Robert Leroe (Retired) 

Wayne MacRae 

*Jerry Malone (Retired) 

Rick Moore 

Warner Simo 

Larry Towne (Retired) 

Kenneth Winters 



Leavenworth KS 
Monroe WA 
Quantico VA 
Saugus MA 
Manchester NJ 
Spokane WA 
Waynesville MO 
Colrdo Springs CO 
Wichita KS 
Gales Ferry CT 



US. Army 
U.S. Navy 
U.S. Navy 
U.S. Army 
U.S. Navy 
U.S. Army 
U.S. Army 
U.S. Army 
U.S. Air Force 
U.S. Navy 



ARMED FORCES RESERVE CHAPLAINS 



Kenneth Can- 
Charles M. Horvath 
Douglas W. Knighton 
David A. Langer 
Steven Morgan 
Stephen Sloat 
David Smith 
James Woods 



Wheaton IL 
Beaver Falls PA 
Woodridge IL 
Dubuque lA 
Los Angeles CA 
Indio CA 
St. Albans VT 
College Station TX 



U.S. Air Force 
U.S. Air Force 
U.S. Air Force 
U.S. Army 
U.S. Navy 
U.S. Navy 
Army Natl Guard 
U.S. Army 



If interested in the Chaplaincy program, contact the CCCC Endorsing Agent, Jerry 
Malone. 

INDUSTRIAL AND INSTITUTIONAL CHAPLAINS 



Homer Branham 
Ralph Camp 
Glenn Davis 
Mark Dowling 
Gary Eno 
John Erwin 
William Ferguson 
Lanny Fly 
William Gwinn 
Gerald Haglund 
Steven Heintz 
Robert Hoaglander 
Thomas Hunter 
George Isley 
Roger Lark 
William Randall 
David Schaffer 
Robert Steinke 
Richard Thompson 
Steve Unger 



Kansas City MO 
Lemoore CA 
Fresno CA 
Easthampton MA 
Caldwell OH 
Charlottesville VA 
Ipswich MA 
Williamsburg VA 
Cathedral City CA 
Jamestown NY 
Vandergrift PA 
Waltham MA 
Albany NY 
Stuyvesant NY 
Oceanside CA 
Muskegon MI 
Fairhaven MA 
Artemas PA 
Hudson OH 
E Setauket NY 



City Union Mission 
Lemoore Fellowship Home 
Fresno County Jail 
Springfield Rescue Mission 
Noble Correctional Institute 
Salvation Army 
Landmark School 
Cumberland Hospital 
Outdoor Resorts Chapel 
Heritage Pk Health Care Ctr 
Redstone Highlands 
Deaconess Waltham Hosp 
Stratton VA Medical Ctr 
Berkshire Farm Center 
Vista Detention Facility 
Muskegon Rescue Mission 
Community Chaplain Serv 
Frederick Memorial Hosp 
Cuyahoga Valley Chr 
University Medical Ctr & FBI 



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98 



SUMMARY OF CHURCH INFORMATION 

Total Churches 256 

Total Membership of CCCC Churches 40,857 

Average Morning Worship Attendance 116 

Average Sunday School Attendance 53 

Total Giving to Local Expenses $29,464,375 

Total Giving to CCCC $149,039 

Total Giving to Missions $6,754,192 

Total Giving to Building Funds $5,019,542 



CCCC GIVING FROM NON-MEMBER 
CHURCHES 

First Congregational Church, Windham CT 75 

Anderson Congregational Church, Kamak IL 500 

First Congregational Church, Crown Point NY 200 

First Evangelical & Reformed Church, Lima OH ' 200 

Total $975 



GIVING FROM REGIONAL FELLOWSHIPS 

Greater Hudson Valley Congregational Fellowship 1 ,200 

Maine Association of Congregational Christian & Community Chs 775 

Conservative Congregational Christian Conference of Michigan 127 

Total $2,102 



99 



ELW^-X H. SA-NDS. C.?»\ 
GESAIJII LiCB.CPX 
OAWUHL/ .\MDBIiSOV. CP.A 
WAtTES a HONEajUNK. C PA. 
ROacRTO l.EF,C?A 
T1!£01X>X£ i UIKXS. L P A 



Sands, Lee aind Anderson, Lid. 

CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS 

Five East County Road B. Suite One 

Saint Paul, Minnesota 55 II 7 



Telephone; (f.5 1)489-1393 

Fax:(651)489-1396 

E-mail: infcK^slaltd.coni 



INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT 



']"o the Board of Directors 

of Conservative Congregational Christian Conference 

St. Paul, Minnesota 



We have audited the accompanying statement of financial position of the Conservative Congregational 
Christian Conference (a non- profit organization) as of December 31, 2000, and the related statements oi 
activities, ftinctiona! expenses, and cash flows for the year then ended. Tliese financial statements are 
the responsibilitj' of the Conference's management. Our responsibility' is to express an opinion on these 
financial statements based on our audit. 

We conducted our audit in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards. Those standards 
require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the fmaacial 
statements are free of material missCaten^ent. An audit includes exarmning on a lest basis, evidence 
supporting the amounts and disciosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the 
accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the 
overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our 
opinion. 

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all maiaial respects, the 
financial position of the Conserv'ative Congregational Christian Conference as of December 31. 2000, 
and the changes in its net assets and its cash ilows for the year then ended in co?ifonnity with generally 
accepted accounting principles. 



St. Paul, Minnesota 
June 22, 2001 



^-TP. 



100 



Consen'attve Congregational Christian Conference 



STATEMENT OF FIN.-\NCL^VL POSITION 
DECEMBER 3 1.2000 



ASSETS 

Cash on Hand and in Banks $ 88,067 

Ceitificate of Deposits ' 288,755 

Receivables 7,712 

Inventory 9,855 

Prepaid Expenses ' 9,702 

Prepaid Insurance " 663 

Property and Equipment - net 99,436 

Total Assets $ 504.190 

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS 

Liabilities / 

Aet:ounts Payable S 4,913 

Withheld Payroll Taxes 2.560 

Total Liabilities 7,473 

Net A.qsets 
Unreslrieted 

Operations 81,396 

Equity in Property and Equipment 99.436 

Total Unrestricted 180,832 

Tcmporanly Restricted 315.885 

Total Net Assets 496.717 

Total Liabilities and Net Assets 5; 504.19n 



Tlie accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements. 

-2- 



101 



Conservative Congregational Christian Conference 



STATEMENT OF ACIIVFJIHS 
YEAR EISTiJaD DECEMBER 3 !. 2QQ0 



Temporarily 
Jnre.stricted Restricted 



Total 



Sutiport and Revenue 

Contributions: 

Churches 

Minister's .Memberships and Ciifts 
Lay Gifts 
Other 
Program Contribuiions 
.'Vnnual Meeting Revenue 

.Sales of Books and Materials - Forsee Publications 
Interest Income 

Net Assets Released from Restrictions tiirough 
Satisfaction of Program Requirements 
Total .Support and Revenue 

Expenses 

Program Services: 
General Programs 
Special Programs 
Forscc Publications 
Support Ser^aces: 

General iind .Administrative 
Total Expenses 

Increase (Decrease) in Net Assets 

Net .A.ssets, Beginning of Year 

Net Assets, End of Year 



$117,046 




S 1 1 7.046 


48,324 




48,324 


9,615 




9,615 


6,239 




6.239 




5 259,275 


259,275 


36,670 




36.670 


82.252 




82,252 


4,742 




4,742 


253.242 


(253.242) 
6,033 


. 


558,130 


564.163 



189,664 

250,392 

80,332 

57.850 




1 89,664 

250.392 

80,332 

57,850 


578,238 


- 


578,238 


(20,108) 
200,940 


6,033 
309,852 


(14,075) 
510,792 


; 180.832 


$315,885 


S496.7I7 



The accompanying notes arc an integral part of these financial statements. 

-3- 



102 



Consen'attve Congregationai Chnstian Conference 



STATEMENT OF FUNCTIONAL EXPENSES 
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER J 1 . 2000 



Staff Support: 

Salary aitd Allowances 
Housing - Rent 
Health Insurance 
Annuity 

Total Staff Support 

Cost of Books and Materials Sold 

Travel 

Office Facilities: 
Association Fees 
Telephone 
Other 

Total Office Facilities 

Office Operations; 
Salaries 
Printing 
Supplies 
Postage 
Other 

Total Ofticc Operations 

Board and Committee Expenses: 
Board and Council Meetings 
Committee Expenses 
Professional Services 

Total Board and Committee Expense 

Publications; 
Forsec 
Yearbook 

Total Publications 



981 

4,875 



5.856 



8,958 

4.774 
13,732 



Proeram Services 


Support 
Services 






Special 


Forsec 
Publi- 




General 


General and 




Programs 


Proerams 


cations 


Administrative 


Totals 


S 31,160 






$ 1,640 


S 32.800 


19,950 






1,050 


21.000 


2,797 






147 


2,944 


6.270 






330 


6.600 


60,177 




358,078 


3,167 


63.344 
58,078 


4,326 




186 




4,512 






/ 


10,443 


10.443 


23M 






795 
2,254 
13,492 


3.179 
2.254 


2,384 


15,876 


40,645 




13,200 


13,548 


67.393 


2,903 






322 


3,225 


3,558 




2.145 


395 


6,09S 


10.83S 




3,451 


2,709 


16,998 






5 SO 


,S,S(>7 


9.387 



19,376 



25,781 



103,101 





3.925 


4,906 
4.S75 


2.692 


4.195 


6.887 


2.692 


8,120 


! 6,668 

8.958 

4,774 



103 



Conserviit'iVC Congregational Christian Conference 





Yll.^R ENDED DECEMBER 31. 200C 


I 








Pro cram .Services 




Support 
Services 






General 
Programs 


Special 
Programs 


Foisee 
Publi- 
cations 






General and 
Administrative 


Totals 


Contribulians: 

NA£ Chaolamcy 

NAE 

Other 

Total Conlnbutions 


900 

750 

481 

2,131 








900 

750 

481 

2,131 


Special Programs: 
Annual Meeting 
Micronesia Mission 
Contributions and Other 
'rotal Special Prograttts 


27,772 

15,342 
43414 
189,664 


SI35,0!4 
115378 
250,392 
250392 


80332 




27,772 
135,014 
130.720. 
29X506 


Totals Before Depreciation 


5CL560 


570,948 


Depreciation of Building and Equipment 








7,290 


7.290 


Total Expenses 


SW9,^M 


SZ5QJ32 


s^nm 


S57.R50 


S578.23S 



The accompany mi; notes are an integral pari of these financial statements, 



104 



Consen'aiive Congregational Cljristjan Conference 



STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS 
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 3 1 . 2000 



CASH USED IN OPERATING ACTlVrnES 
Decrease in net assets 

Adjustments to reconcile decrease m net assets to 
cash provided by operations: 
Depreciation and amortization 
(Increase) Decrease in: 
Receivables 
Inventors- 
Prepaid expenses 
Increase (Decrease) in: 
Accounts payable 
Accrued payroll expenses 

Net Cash Used In Operating Acti\'ities 

CASH USED IN ns\T.STING ACnVITIES 
Purchase equipment 
Purchase certificates of deposit 

Total Cash Used In Invcstmg Activities 

Decrease in Cash 

Cash, Beginning of Year 

Cash, End of Year 



S (14,075) 



7,290 

255 

(2.692) 

(3,341) 

(7,001) 
523 

(19.041) 



(2,851) 
(58,755) 
(61,606) 

(80,647) 

168,714 
$ 88.067 



"Hie accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements. 

-6- 



105 



Conser\-at!vc Congregational Christian Conference 
December 3 1 , 2000 



NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 



1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 

The following is a summary of significant accounting policies followed in the preparation of these 
financial statements: 

Basis of AccountiniE 

Tlie Conference maintains its accounting records on the basis of cash receipts and disbursements. 
For financial statement purposes, however, both beginning and year-end balances have been 
converted to the accrual method of accounting. 

The accounts of the Conference arc maintained in accordance with the principles of fund 
accounting. Under fund accounting, resources for various purposes arc classified for accountmg 
and reporting purposes into funds established according to their nature and purpose. Separate 
accounts are maintained for each fund; however, in the accompanying financial statements, funds 
have been combined and presented for the Conference as a whole in accordance with the pro\'isions 
of Statement of Financial Accountmg Standards No, 117, "Financial Statements of Not-for-Profit 
Organizations." Under SFAS 1 17, the Conference is required to report information regarding its 
financial position and activities according to three classes of net assets: unrestricted net assets, 
temporanly restricted net as.sets. and permanently restricted net assets. 

Invcn^or^' 

Forscc Publications maintains an inventory of books and other materials it purchases for resale. 

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or market on a first-in, fir.st-out basis. 

Property and Equipment 

Propertv' and equipment is recorded at cost and depreciated over the estimated useful hves of the 

individual depreciable assets using the straight Hne method. 

Maintenance, repairs and minor renewals are charged to expense while major renewals and 
beitermcnts are capitalized. 

Contributions 

Contributions received are recorded as unrestricted, temporarily restricted, or permanently restricted 

support, depending on the existence and;''or nature of any donor restrictions. 

Gifts of cash and other assets are reported as restricted support if they are received with donor 
stipulations that limit the use of the donated assets. When a restriction expires, that is, when a 
stipulated time restnction ends or a purpose restriction is accomplished, temporarily restricted net 
assets arc reclassified to unrestricted net assets and reported in the statement of activities as net 
assets released from restrictions. 



„7^ 



106 



Conservative Congregalional Chnstian Conference 
December 3 1 , 2000 



NOTES TO FfNANCJAL STATEMENTS fContinued ) 



Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Cantinued) 

Donated Sep/ices 

No amounts have been reflected in the financial statements for donated services. The Conference 

pays for most services requiring specific expertise. 

Allocated Expenses 

Expenses by fiinction have been allocated among program and supporting services classifications 

on the basis of estimates made by the Conference's management. 

Use of Estimates 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting 
principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect ccrtam reported 
amounts and disclosures. Accordingly, actual results could differ trom those estimates. 

2. Nature of Organization 

The Consen-ative Congregational Christian Conference is an association of congregationally 

governed churches to assist those churches by extending their fellowship, encouraging their 
W'imcss, and facilitating cooperation and to presen,'e and promote Scriptural principles of local 
church autonomy and the freedom of the believer in Chri.st. 

3- Office FaciHties 

In 1983 the Conll^rence purchased an office condominium located m St. Paul, Minnesota at a 
total cost of Si5 1 ,268.00. Tliis property is currently being used by the Conference as its head- 
quarters. 'Hie purchase price was funded entirely through contributions and required no 
additional financing. 

4. I nventory 

Inventory at December 31, 2000 is comprised primarily of books and educauonal materials with a 
cost of $9,855. 



107 



ConseiA'ative C^ongregational Christian Conference 
December 31. 2000 



NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMHNTS (Continued) 

5. ProE grtA, P^quipment and Accumulated Depreciation 

Prope!t\', equipment and accumulated depreciation are as t^bilows as of December 31, 2000: 

Asset Cost: 

Building - Office Condominium $151,268 

I'umiture, Fixtures and Equipment 44,856 

Total 196,124 

Less accumulated depreciation 96,688 



IVoperty and Equipment - Net $ 99.436 

Depreciation Expense: 

Building - Office Condommium $ 3,782 

I'umiture, Fixtures and Equipment 3,508 

Total S 7.290 

6, Unrestricted Net Assets 

Included m unrestricted net assets are fund accounts established by the Board of Directors for 
special purposes. Following is a summar>' of those accoimts for the year ended December 3 1, 2000: 





Balance 




Balance 




1/1/00 


Receipts 


Disbursements 12/31/00 


.Annual Meeting Ftmd 


$ 5,000.00 


$36,669.93(3) 


536,669.93(1) $ 5,000.00 


Annual Meeting Reserve 


7,351.34 


25.00 


7,376.34 


Area Reps Meeting Accraal 


1,531.57 


1,000.00(2) 


2,531.57 


Conference Emergency Fimd 


26,576.54 


4,677.21(2) 


15,342.06 15,911.69 



Totals S 4(),459.45 S 42.372.14 SQMXM $ 30.819.60 

(1) Includes tiansfers to general operating fund of .S8,898.35. 

(2) Includes transfer from general operating fund of $5,677.21. 

(3) Includes transfer from special program funds of S 1 ,458.50. 



108 



Conservative Congregational Cliristian Conference 
December 3 1,2000 



NOTES TO FINANCLAJL STATEMENTS (Continued) 



7. Temporarily Restricted Net Assets 

Following is a summary of temporarily restricted net assets available for the following purposes as 
of December 3 1 , 2000 and their current year activity: 





Balance 






Balance 




1/1/00 


Receipts 
S 9,252.35 


Di.sbursements 
S 1,411.26(1)$ 


12/31/00 


Church Muliiplication 


$ 18,432.54 


26,273.63 


Designated Gifts 


515,24 


9. 850.00 


9,850.00 


515.24 


Scholarship Fund 


20,612.11 


14,178.86 


4,950.00 


29,840.97 


Calvary Trust (C.E.C.C.) 


154,066.49 


9,976.27 


10,000.00(1) 


154,042.76 


Cornerstone Corps 


6,395.36 


7,973.09 


13,355.78 


1,012.67 


World Relief 


24,094.07 


10,957.44 


26,094.07 


8.957.44 


Mission Fund 


4.653.03 


1.250.00 


- 


5,903.03 


Ministerial Emergency Fund 


6,818.57 


1,670.76 


1 .900.00 


6,589.33 


Micronesia Mission Fund 


26,455.99 


81.634.75(1) 


83.152.82(1) 


24,937.92 


Micronesia Launching Fund 


5.275.00 


800.00 


6,075.00 


- 


Micronesia Furlough Accrual-Wilbi 


,T 2,063.53 


3,000.00(1) 


- 


5,063.53 


Micronesia - Robert Stanton 


5,795.37 


35,992.91(1) 


39,828.89(1) 


1,959.39 


Micronesia - James Hamilton 


- 


11,876.06 


8,123.55 


3,752.51 


Micronesia - Jake Hartnelt 


- 


3,284.75 


76.50 


3,208.25 


Micronesia Administrative 


- 


6,333.34 


6,333.34(2) 


- 


Micronesia Furlough 


- 


1,700.00(1) 


- 


1,700.00 


Micronesia Scholarship Fund 


94.50 


1,118.00 


734.50 


478.00 


Conference Relief 


7,520.72 


1.217.48 


5,000.00 


3,738.20 


Congregational Saidies Fund 


(426.60) 


- 


- 


(426.60) 


Congregational House 


(1.537.16) 


- 


- 


(1,537.16) 


History Book 


- 


- 


3,080.00 


(3,080.00) 


Benefits Clearing Account 


1,951.90 


27,237.88 


21,277.87 


7,911.91 


Wagner Gift Annuity Trust 


9,076.19 


596.26 


800.04 


8,872.41 


Macedonia Project 


900.00 


- 


865.00 


35.00 


Women's Project l-und 


- 


638.00 


638.00 


- 


Regional Representative 


16,174.33 


24.732.75(1) 


11,674.54 


29,232.54 


WECF - Afi-ican Church 


1,470.00 


- 


1,470.00 


- 


Designated - Office Equipment 


(549.55) 


- 


2,851.09(3) 


(3,400.64) 


Mizpah Subsidy 


- 


304.32 


- 


304.32 


Totals 


S3,09.5.S|.63, 


$265.575.27 


5259.542.25 $315,884.65 



(1) Includes interflind transfers of 56,300.00. 

(2) Includes transfers to unrestricted funds of $3,926.95 

(3) Includes transfer to operating fund of $2,851.09. 



-10- 



109 



Conscn^ative Congregational ChriiJiian Conference 
December 31, 2000 



NOTES I'O FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued) 



8. Calvary Trust (C.E.C.C.) 

The Conference entered into a merger agreement with Calvary Evangelical Congregational Church 
effective December 16, 1 99 1 , whereby all assets of Calvarv' were transferred to the Conservative 
Congregational Christian Conference. These assets are to be held in trust by the Conference, with 
the annual earnings therefrom being distributed to certain beneficiaries in accordance with 
provisions of the agiccntent. 

9. Tax Status 

The Conlt-rcnce has filed for and received tax exempt status under Internal Revenue Code 
Section 501(c)(3). 

10- Off-Balaace Sheet Risk 

TIic Conference maintains its cash balances at Wells Fargo, St. Paul, NfN. At December 31, 2000 
it had $195,298 in excess of federally insured limits for deposits. The possibilit)' of loss exists if a 
bank holding excess deposits were to fail. 



-11- 



110 



2002 CONFERENCE BUDGET 
RECEIPTS 

Churches $145,669 

Ministers 54,000 

Laymen 10,000 

Foresee Publications 13,200 

Other 15,000 

NE Regional Minister 60,425 

TOTAL RECEIPTS $298,294 

EXPENSES 
CONFERENCE MINISTER 

Salary $37,550 

Medical Benefits 1,850 

Annuity 6,600 

Housing 22,000 

TOTAL $68,000 

NE REGIONAL MINISTER 

(includes salary, benefits, ministry expenses) 

TOTAL $62,71 1 

TRAVEL 

Conference Minister 7,000 

Other Officers 500 

TOTAL $7,500 

OFFICE EXPENSES 

Association Fees 11,000 

Utilities 650 

Telephone 3,200 

Equipment Maintenance 3,000 

Printing 2,000 

Supplies 3,000 

Postage 14,000 

Salaries 81,400 

Other 3,500 

Repayment to Emergency Fund 3,333 

TOTAL $125,083 

BOARD & COMMITTEE EXPENSES 

Council Meetings 4,000 

Audit/Legal Fees 4,200 

Other 500 

Area Representatives 5,000 

Credentials Committee 2,000 

Other Committees 1,500 

TOTAL $17,200 

PUBLICATIONS 

Yearbook 5,000 

Foresee 9,000 

Other 250 

TOTAL $14,250 

CONTRIBUTIONS 

NAE 750 

NAE Chaplaincy 1,000 

NCMAF 200 

WECF 1,000 

NatT Pro Life Religious Council 500 

Cong Library & Historical Society 100 

TOTAL $3,550 

TOTAL EXPENSES $298,294 

I 1 1 



CONFERENCE BENEFACTORS 



Ackermann, Elizabeth E. 
Andrick, Mr. & Mrs. William C. 

Bailey, Mr. & Mrs. Orrin H. 
Balvance, Mrs. Josephine 
Berdan, Mrs. Maurine 
Bethards, Mrs. Elsie 
Bishel, Mr. & Mrs. Don 
Brook, Mary L. 
Byer, Mr. & Mrs. Everett 

Carlson, Mr. & Mrs. Laurie E 

Collins, Bethany L. 

Cook, Marie L. 

Cook, Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. 

Cuffey, Mrs. Rita 

Dawson, Mr. & Mrs. Glen 
DeMaire, Mrs. Allegra 
DeVinney, Mr. & Mrs. C. R. 
Drs, Marilyn S. 

Eakins, Lauraine 

Farwell, Mr. & Mrs. George L. 
Fegler, Mr. & Mrs. Walter L. 

Gaiser, Mr. & Mrs. James M. 
Graham, Jeanette 
Griffith, Mr. & Mrs. Daniel 
Griem, Ted A. 
Guba, Anne L. 

Ham, Helmi T. 
Hamilton, Mrs. Dorothy 
Hardt, Mrs. Katherina 
Harris, Rev. & Mrs. Amos 
Hemberger, Anna 
Hetherington, Mr. & Mrs. Earl 
Holle, Mardell 
Hudson, Mr. & Mrs. James 
Hunting, Dr. & Mrs Ward M. 



San Marcos, CA 
Uniontown, OH 

Muskegon, MI 

Blue Earth, MN 

Bayard, NE 

Cobden, IL 

Madera, CA 

Shelby, OH 

Sabetha, KS 

Batavia, IL 

Rehoboth, MA 

Lake View, NY 

N. Dighton, MA 

Bloomington, IN 

Pasadena, CA 

New Haven, MI 

New Baltimore, MI 

Collinsville, CT 

Spring Valley, WI 

Benson, VT 
Gering, NE 

Carlsbad, CA 

Highland, IL 

Sutton, MA 

Simi Valley, CA 

Kingston, MA 

Ashbumham, MA 

Lakewood, NY 

Scottsbluff, NE 

Scottsbluff, NE 

Aurora, IL 

Shorewood, MN 

New Salem, ND 

Viroqua, WI 

New Salem, MA 



112 



CONFERENCE BENEFACTORS continued 



Jahnke, Augusta (Nony) 
Jarvi, Mr. & Mrs. Edwin 
Jesse, Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth B. 
Johnson, Diane M. 
Johnson, Mr. & Mrs. Robert R. 
Johnson, Rodric C. 
Joki, Mr. & Mrs. Ronald 

Kirchmeier, Mr. & Mrs. Dennis 
Kleinendorst, Mr. & Mrs. Cecil M. 
Konsor, Mr. & Mrs. Gary 
Krueger, Mr. & Mrs. Richard A. 
Kuhn, Mr. & Mrs. William H. 

Laurenti, Mrs. Arlene 
Lawrenz, Mr. & Mrs. Arlynn 
Lawry, Mr. & Mrs. Mark H 
Ledri, Mr. & Mrs. Hans 
Levin, Bethel 
Lyon, Mr. E. Paul 

Matook, Mr. & Mrs. John N. 
Maurer, Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. 
McDaniel, Dee J. 
McGarvey, Mr. & Mrs. Ken 
Mcintosh, Lisa 
Mitchell, Mr. & Mrs. John R. 

Nalley, Mr. & Mrs. Todd H. 
Nazarian, Dorothy 
Nygren, Mr. & Mrs. Jack D. 
Nygren, Mr. & Mrs. William V 

Peck, Mr. & Mrs Edward R. 
Pierce, Mr. & Mrs. Leslie 
Pinke, Mrs. Doris 
Pisaneschi, Mr. & Mrs. Peter 
Pohly, Mrs. Faye 

Reever, Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth P. 
Reid, Mr. & Mrs. Robert 
Reynolds, Miss Dorothy A. 
Roberts, Cynthia 
Roberts, Mr. & Mrs. Jack L. 



New Brighton, MN 

Britt, MN 

St. Paul, MN 

Woodbury, MN 

Bemus Point, NY 

Bradford, ME 

Maynard, MA 

Beulah, ND 

St. Paul, MN 

Avon, MN 

Kingston, MA 

Central City, NE 

Kingston, MA 

Avon, MN 

Milford, OH 

Vista,CA 

St. Paul, MN 

Highland, IL 

S. Hamilton, MA 

Marion, OH 

Scottsbluff, NE 

Atlanta, MI 

Bloomfield Hills, MI 

Royal Oak, MI 

Carlsbad, CA 

Nottingham, NH 

Woodbury, MN 

Mesa, AZ 

Oregon City, OR 

Tulsa, OK 

Palm Harbor, FL 

Highland, IL 

Chesterfield, MI 

Hopedale, MA 

Avon, CT 

Haverhill, MA 

Huntington, MA 
Bronx, NY 



113 



CONFERENCE BENEFACTORS continued 



Roe, Mr. & Mrs. Isaiah F. 
Romero, Mr. & Mrs. Albert J. 

Schneider, Mr. & Mrs. PhilUp 
Shervy, Mrs. Mildred 
Simpson, Mr. & Mrs. Robert 
Scott, Mr. & Mrs Lawrence 
Soules, Ardys 

Stathopoulos, Mr. & Mrs. George 
Stimpson, Mr. & Mrs Truel 
Stine, Mr. & Mrs. Jack C. 
Strutz, Mrs. Lorraine R. 
Sturtevant, Miss Ruth E. 

Tatem, Mr. & Mrs. Stewart M. 
Taylor, Rev. Richard H. 
Tompkins, Mrs. Jane E. 
Troxell, Mr. & Mrs. Gary G. 

Umphlett, Mr. & Mrs. Floyd R. 

Van Blarcom, Mr. Stephen L. 

Wagner, Mrs. Violet 
Wagner, Mr. Edwin 
Warga, Mr. & Mrs. Raymond J. 
Watts, Mrs. Lois 
Welles, Dr. & Mrs. Marshall P. 
Weseloh, Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. 
Whitcher, Mrs. Fern 
Wiering, Mr. & Mrs. Peter 
Wildes, Mrs. Cynthia C. 
Williams, Mr. David A. 
Williamson, Mr. & Mrs. Herb 
Wilson, Mrs. Katherine 
Witham, Mr. & Mrs. Elmer E. 

Yaghoobian, Mrs. Josephine 

Zeyl, Mr. & Mrs. Donald 



Highland, IL 
Vista, CA 

Palmyra, WI 

Naperville, IL 

Newton, IL 

Mendon, MA 

Chattanooga, TN 

Maiden, MA 

Vista, CA 

Freeport, IL 

New Haven, MI 

Kingston, MA 

Eastford, CT 

Providence, RI 

Clifton Park, NY 

Oshkosh, WI 

Suffolk, VA 

Pittsfield, MA 

Turtle Lake, ND 

Turtle Lake, ND 

Holdingford, MN 

S. Easton, MA 

Duarte, CA 

Blue Island, IL 

Platteville, WT 

Minneapohs, MN 

Largo, FL 

Fort Worth, TX 

Aplington, lA 

Marietta, NY 

Roseville, MN 

Pawtucket, RI 

Kingston, RI 



114 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE 

CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATIONAL 

CHRISTIAN CONFERENCE 

(Revised 1997) 
PREAMBLE 

In gratitude to Almighty God for the gift of salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ; and 
beheving that, to the glory of God, the task of the church of Jesus Christ is three-fold, i.e., 
the worship of God, the edification of the saints, and the evangelization of the world; and 
believing further that there is a definite need among congregationally governed churches 
of historic Biblical persuasion for an association to assist them in the performance of said 
task: We therefore as autonomous churches declaring our unqualified belief in the entire 
Word of God written, humbly invoking the guidance of the Holy Spirit, have covenanted 
together to form such an association. 

Article I - Name 

The name of this organization shall be: THE CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATIONAL 
CHRISTIAN CONFERENCE, hereinafter called the Conference. 

Article II - Purpose 

1 . To promote the worship of God in our churches. 

2. To deepen and extend the fellowship of our churches. 

3. To encourage a steadfast. Biblical witness by our churches. 

4. To facilitate cooperation and counsel among our churches with regard to evangelism, 
edification. Christian education, stewardship, missions, church extension. Christian ac- 
tion, women's and men's fellowships, youth activities, the pastoral ministry, and other 
related concerns. 

5 . To preserve and promote the Scriptural principles of the autonomy of the local church 
and the freedom of the believer in Christ. 



Article III - Statement of Faith 

1 . We believe the Bible consisting of the Old and New Testament, to be the only in- 
spired, inerrant, infallible, authoritative Word of God written. 

2. We believe that there is one God, eternally existent in three persons: Father, Son and 
Holy Ghost. 

3. We believe in the deity of Christ, in His virgin birth, in His sinless life, in His miracles, 
in His vicarious and atoning death through His shed blood, in His bodily resurrection, in 
His ascension to the right hand of the Father, and in His personal return in power and 
glory. 

4. We believe that for salvation of lost and sinful man regeneration by the Holy Spirit is 
absolutely essential. 

5. We believe in the present ministry of the Holy Spirit by Whose indwelling power and 
fullness the Christian is enabled to live a godly life in this present evil world. 

6. We believe in the resurrection of both the saved and the lost; they that are saved unto 
the resurrection of life and they that are lost unto the resurrection of damnation. 

7. We believe in the spiritual unity of all believers in Christ. 



115 



Article IV - Statement of Polity 

1 . We believe that Jesus Christ is the Head of His body, the Church universal, and of each 
local church. 

2. We believe that each local church is in itself a complete church, and therefore autono- 
mous and possesses all rights and responsibilities of the church by the Holy Spirit as set 
forth in the Holy Scriptures. 

3. We believe that Jesus Christ exercises His authority in each local church by the Holy 
Spirit and through the Holy Scriptures. 

4. We believe that each local church is ultimately answerable only to Jesus Christ, and 
not to any association, conference, council, synod or any other ecclesiastical body. 

5. We believe that it is proper and beneficial for each local church to seek fellowship 
and counsel of other such local churches. 

Article V - Membership 

1. Membership in this Conference shall be attained by the voluntary association of 
churches, ministers or individual laymen who find themselves in full accord with the 
Statement of Faith and Statement of Polity (Articles III,IV) of this Constitution, and with 
the general principles of this Conference as set forth in the Constitution and By-laws. 
Conference membership, whether of church, minister or laymen, may be subject to review 
by the ensuing Amiual Meeting of the Conference. Ministerial membership shall be ac- 
corded on the basis of the approved ministerial standards of the Conference, as set forth in 
the By-laws of this Constitution. Churches are not necessarily barred from membership 
because of other affiliations so long as they adhere to the Statement of Faith and the 
Statement of Polity and the workings of the Conference. Individual Lay Membership may 
be held only by members of congregationally governed churches which are not members of 
this Conference. In the event that a non-member church joins this Conference, the indi- 
vidual lay membership of any of its members ceases. 

2. A church, minister or individual lay member may withdraw from membership in this 
Conference at any time by its or his own action, and will be removed from the membership 
when written notice of such action is given to the Chairman of the Credentials Committee. 

3. A church, minister or individual lay member may be dismissed from membership in 
this Conference for continued inactivity, at the decision of the Credentials Committee and 
the ratification of the Conference. 

4. In the event that there is received a written statement that a member church, minister 
or individual lay member has departed from the standards of faith and practice set forth in 
this Consdtution and By-laws or in the Code of Ethics for Ministers and Churches, the 
Credentials Committee shall make a careful investigation of the matter. If the charge ap- 
pears to the Committee to be justified and is received in accordance with I Timothy 5:19 
from at least two or three witnesses, the Committee shall report the matter to the Confer- 
ence for appropriate action. The Credentials Committee shall file their report in writing 
with the Recording Secretary of the Conference and the party accused at least thirty days 
prior to the annual or special meeting at which the report is to be considered. The right to 
appeal to the Conference by the party accused is presupposed. 

Article VI - Associated Relationships 

The Conservative Congregational Chrisdan Conference encourages the forming of local 
fellowships, conferences or associations of churches and ministers who are in accordance 
with Article V, Section 1 of the Constitution and who are in sympathy with the Statements 
of Faith and Polity of this Conference. 

Fellowships, conferences, or associations, whether state or area, may be recognized in this 
associated relationship upon request to and approval by the Credentials Committee. Such 
action will be subject to review by the ensuing Annual Meeting of the Conference. 

Recognition by the Conference does not bestow membership in this Conference upon 
churches or ministers of the respective groups. Churches, ministers, or individual laymen 
may attain voluntary membership according to Article V - Membership, of this Constitu- 
tion. 

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Fellowships, conferences or associations, recognized by this Conference, will be repre- 
sented in the Conference business meetings by the delegates of their member churches 
which are also members of this Conference. 

Article VII - Meetings 

1 . ANNUAL MEETING. There shall be an Annual Meeting of the Conference at such 
time and place as determined by the Executive Committee, unless the same are specifi- 
cally designated by the Annual Meeting of the previous year. 

2. SPECIAL MEETINGS. These may he called at the direction of the Executive Com- 
mittee, or upon written request of members representing one-fifth of the total membership 
of the Conference. 

3. REPRESENTATION. Churches becoming members of the Conference shall be en- 
titled to representation at various meetings of the Conference by the pastors and two lay 
delegates who shall be members of that local church for the first 1 00 members or fraction 
thereof and thereafter one delegate who is a member of that local church for each 500 
members or fraction thereof 

Voting privileges at Conference meetings shall also be extended to ministerial members 
who are without a charge, to individual lay members of the Conference, with the under- 
standing that not more than one layman from any non-member church shall be entitled to 
vote, and to all Conference Officers and members of the Board of Directors. 

4. PROCEDURE. The guide for parliamentary procedure in all meetings shall be Robert's 
Rules of Order, Revised, in all cases not covered by special rules of this Constitution and 
by-laws. 

Article VIII - Officers 

1 . The elected officers of this Conference shall be: 

a. A President, a Vice-President, a Recording Secretary, a Conference Minister, a 
Treasurer and a Controller. 

b. The term of office for each of the above officers shall be three years, and for the 
duration of their tenure they shall be ex-officio members of the Conference Board of 
Directors with full voting rights. 

c. The terms of the President and the Vice-President shall expire simultaneously; the 
following year the terms of the Conference Minister and the Controller shall expire; 
and the third year the terms of the Recording Secretary and the Treasurer shall ex- 
pire. 

d. The office of the Conference President and the Conference Vice-President shall be 
limited to one term, but following a one year lapse, their eligibility for re-election 
shall be restored. No Conference officer, except for the Conference Minister, may 
serve more than nine consecutive years in Conference offices without a lapse of at 
least one year between those offices. 

2. The duly elected officers of the Conference shall hold their office until their succes- 
sors are chosen and installed in their stead which shall be at the Annual Meeting at which 
they are elected. 

3. If for any reason an officer chooses to resign, a letter of resignation shall be directed 
to the President, who in turn shall call it to the attention of the Board of Directors, which 
Board will have the power to accept such a resignation between the meetings of the Con- 
ference. This procedure shall also be followed if any members of the Board of Directors 
choose to resign. In the event that the President resigns, the letter of resignation shall be 
directed to the Conference Minister, who shall present it to the Board of Directors for 
action. 

Article IX - Board of Directors 

1 . The business of the Conference shall be conducted and the property of the Confer- 
ence shall be managed by a Board of Directors, numbering not fewer than twelve nor more 
than thirty members, and shall include the elected officers of the Conference. The initial 



117 



Board having been elected in three equal groups, for one year, for two years, and three years, 
respectively, one-third of the membership of the Board of Directors (exclusively of the 
Conference Officers named in Article VIII who are ex-officio members of the Board with full 
voting rights) shall be elected annually for a term of three years in future Annual Meetings of 
the Conference. No Board member may be elected to two fiiU consecutive terms without a 
minimum of a one year lapse, after which eligibility will be restored. No Board member, 
elected to that position, may serve concurrently as a Conference officer. In the election of 
Board members, consideration shall be given to geographic representation and to representa- 
tion from the Conference committees. 

2. The Board of Directors shall establish an Executive Committee, to consist of the 
officers of the Conference. The Board may delegate to the Executive Committee such of 
its powers and authority as may be deemed necessary for the proper functioning of the 
Conference. 

3. The Board of Directors shall fill any vacancy arising among the officers of the Con- 
ference, the Committees or in the Board itself, until the next Annual Meeting of the Con- 
ference at which time the Conference shall fill the vacancy for the unexpired term. 

4. The Board of Directors shall appoint annually an Endorsing Agent for Military Chap- 
lains who shall represent the Conference on the Chaplaincy Commission of the National 
Association of Evangelicals. All military endorsements are subject to review of the Board of 
Directors. 

5. The Board of Directors shall establish Foresee Publications as the Christian Educa- 
tion supply and publication arm of the Conference; such operation to be under the direc- 
tion of the Board of Directors. 

6. Any action of the Board of Directors may be subject to review and ratification by the 
Conference at its Annual Meeting or any special meeting. 

Article X-Incorporation 

This revised Constitution and By-laws shall become the Constitution and By-laws of the 
Corporation established under the Constitution and By-laws replaced by this instrument. 

Article XI-By-Laws 

The Conference shall adopt such By-laws as it shall deem appropriate and necessary for 
the operation of the Conference. The By-laws shall provide for the manner of amendment 
thereof 

Article XII-Amendments 

Amendments to this Constitution shall be proposed in writing by submitting the same to 
the Recording Secretary at the Annual Meeting preceding their consideration for adoption. 
These amendments shall be read to the Annual Meeting and copies of the same shall be 
mailed as soon as possible after the Annual Meeting at which they are first proposed to 
each of the Conference members (churches, ministers, and individual lay members). A 
two-thirds favorable vote of the delegates duly elected, and of others entitled to vote (See 
Article VII, paragraph 3), shall be required for adoption; and the orderly numbering, let- 
tering, capitalization and spelling of the Articles shall be cared for by the Constitution 
Study Committee. 

Article XIII- Dissolution 

No part of the net earnings or other assets of this Conference shall ever inure to the benefit 
of any donor, member, or officer of this Conference, or of any private individual. No donor, 
member, individual committee, associate or affiliate member or officer of this Conference 
shall be entitled to be a recipient in the distribution of any assets of this Conference upon 
dissolution. Any assets of said Conference must be distributed or given to one or more 
organizations recognized by the Internal Revenue Service as one organized exclusively for 
religious, charitable, scientific, literary, or educational purposes. 



118 



BY-LAWS 
I - Board of Directors 

1 . The President of the Conference shall serve as Chairman of the Board of Directors, and 
shall preside at all meetings. 

2. Regular meetings of the Board of Directors shall be held at such time and place as shall 
be determined by the Board, but not less than once a year. 

3. Special meetings of the Board of Directors may be called by the Conference President 
on one month's notice to each Board member. Such meetings may be also called by the 
Conference Minister in like manner upon written request of any five members of the Board. 
A business quorum shall be any majority of the members of the Board. 

4. The Board of Directors shall keep written minutes of each meeting, which are to be 
made available to the Conference upon request. 

5. The Board of Directors may employ or cause to be employed such other persons as 
the needs of the Conference may require. 

II - Officers 

1 . The Board of Directors or the Executive Committee may appoint in addition to the 
offices provided for in the Constitution such assistant secretaries, assistant treasurers and 
other subordinate officers and agents as may be deemed necessary. Such appointed offic- 
ers shall hold office for the terms of, and exercise the powers and perform the duties 
assigned to them by the action of the appointing body. 

2. The President shall be the Chairman of the Board of Directors and the Executive 
Committee, and shall preside at all their meetings, as well as at the meeting of the Confer- 
ence as a whole. He may, with the consent of the Board of Directors, delegate to other 
elected officers of the Conference such presidential authority and power as may be deemed 
necessary and appropriate to facilitate Conference operations. He shall, under authority of 
the Board of Directors, have general oversight over the ministry of the Conference. 

3. The Vice-President shall, in the absence of the President, perform the duties and 
functions of his office, and in addition thereto such other duties as the Board of Directors 
may from time to time prescribe. 

4. The Recording Secretary, or a temporary substitute, shall attend all meetings of the 
Board of Directors and of the Conference and cause to be recorded all the votes and min- 
utes of all proceedings in a book to be kept for that purpose. He shall perform all such 
other duties as may be prescribed by the Board of Directors or the Executive Committee. 

5. The Conference Minister shall be the Executive Director and Pastor of the Confer- 
ence. He shall promote and represent the Conference to both members and non-members, 
in order to accomplish the purpose of the Conference as stated in Article II, Sections 1-5 of 
the Constitution. He shall be responsible for the functioning of all committees. He shall 
have an advisory relationship with the various regional fellowships associated with the 
Conference. He shall conduct the official correspondence of the Conference, and shall 
give notice of all meetings of the members and of the Conference committees. 

He shall be responsible for the registration for the Annual Meeting. He shall maintain an 
official record of the Conference membership and have custody of the Conference seal 
which he shall apply with his signature to any documents requiring it when authorized by 
the Board of Directors, Executive Committee or the President. He shall receive and pro- 
cess all money received by the Conference according to procedures developed in conjunc- 
tion with the Treasurer and the Finance Committee. He shall perform such other duties as 
may be prescribed by the Board of Directors, the Executive Committee or the President 
under whose supervision he shall be. 

6. The Treasurer shall have custody of the corporate funds and securities of the Confer- 
ence, and shall cause the same to be kept in a safe deposit box as directed by the Board of 
Directors. He shall cause to be kept full and accurate accounts of receipts and disburse- 
ments in books belonging to the Conference, and shall deposit all monies and other valu- 
able effects in the name of and credit of the Conference, in repositories indicated by the 
Board of Directors. The Board of Directors are to see that the Treasurer's books be audited 

119 



annually by an approved certified public accountant, the report of which will be made 
directly to the Board of Directors and be made available to the Conference membership. 

7. The Controller shall approve the expenditures of all monies in accordance with the 
adopted budget. He shall assist the Treasurer in the preparation of the budget for presen- 
tation to the Board of Directors at the Annual Meeting. He shall make such recommenda- 
tions to the Board of Directors for the handling of funds that he deems necessary for proper 
stewardship. 

Ill - Committees 

1 . In addition to the Executive Committee, the following Conference Life Committees 
shall be provided to serve Conference members. The Chairman of each Committee shall 
be appointed by the Board of Directors. The Committees, while subject to the Board of 
Directors, shall function under the supervision of the Conference Minister. 

A pastor of a member church, who does not hold his standing in the Conference, may serve 
on any committee, with the exception of the Credentials Committee, as long as he is pastor 
of a member church. If he ceases his relationship to a member church, he is automatically 
dropped from the Committee membership, unless he is called to another member church. 
He may not be elected to the Board or a Conference office. 

Associate members may serve on any committee with the exception of the Credentials 
Committee. They may not be elected to the Board, a Conference office, or appointed to 
Committee chairmanship. 

Each Committee shall prepare a written report of progress to be presented at the Annual 
Meeting of the Conference and at such other times as the Board of Directors shall request 
it. 

2. A Conference Education Committee of three to be elected by the Conference on a 
rotating basis for three-year terms. This Committee shall make available a continuing 
education program for member ministers serving our churches who are in need of addi- 
tional training. It shall encourage the mentoring of less experienced ministers by those 
who are more experienced and mature. The Committee shall seek to promote a better 
understanding of Congregationalism in general within the Conference. This Committee 
shall administer the Conference Care program, including the scholarship fund. The Com- 
mittee shall, upon request, make recommendations as to theological schools, Bible col- 
leges or other accredited institutions and render such other counsel and assistance as is 
necessary. The Board shall appoint an Historian for a three-year term to be an ex-officio 
member of this Committee. The Historian shall assure that the Conference office is a 
repository for materials of historical interest, maintain an historical account of the Confer- 
ence from its inception, and promote an interest in the churches in the details of their own 
histories and anniversaries. 

3 . A Conference Growth Committee of three to be elected by the Conference on a 
rotating basis for three-year terms. This Committee shall encourage and stimulate the 
growth of the Conference as a whole by providing the Conference constituency with infor- 
mation concerning the establishment of new churches and concerning needy churches to 
whom assistance and counsel would be helpful. The Committee shall seek to interest non- 
affiliated congregationally governed churches in Conference membership. It shall admin- 
ister the Church Multiplication Fund, the Conference Relief Fund and the Cornerstone 
Corps. 

4. A Constitution Study Committee of three to be elected by the Conference on a 
rotating basis for three-year terms. This Committee shall annually review the Constitution 
and By-laws, offer for consideration any appropriate revisions or amendments, and take 
necessary procedural steps to bring them before the Conference. This Committee shall 
study also the constitutional problems for local churches at the request of the same, and 
recommend suggestions for improving the constitution thereof The chairman of this Com- 
mittee shall serve as the Conference Parliamentarian. 

5. A Credentials Committee of five to be elected by the Board of Directors on a rotat- 
ing basis for three-year terms; the Conference Minister and the Endorsing Agent for Mili- 
tary Chaplains shall both be ex-officio member of this Committee without vote. This Com- 
mittee shall have the following duties: 

120 



a. The Committee shall receive and review all applications for membership in the 
Conference. In making such a review, the Committee shall make every reasonable 
effort to investigate and interview all individuals making application to the Confer- 
ence. The investigation should include, if at all possible, a personal interview by a 
member of the Committee or by a Board member, or by a member of the Conference, 
if the first two are impractical. They shall either approve or disapprove the applica- 
tion, or refer it to the Board of Directors for review. In the event of approval, the 
Committee has power to grant membership subject to approval by the next Annual 
Meeting of the Conference. 

b. The Committee shall take action with regard to requests for transferal or dismissal, 
such action being subject to approval by the next Annual Meeting of the Conference 
except where dismissal has been requested by the party in question. 

c. All applications for membership, transfer, or dismissal, either approved or disap- 
proved by the Committee and all such applications then in process are to be listed and 
circulated by the Committee to the entire membership of the Conference not less than 
thirty days before the Annual Meeting. Only those so listed and circulated shall be 
presented to the Annual Meeting for ratification. 

d. The Committee shall have the power to renew ministerial licenses granted by the 
Conference upon application by the licensee. 

e. The Committee shall have the power to receive applications from prospective stu- 
dents who wish to prepare themselves for some fomi of the Gospel ministry and who 
desire to come under Conference Care. Such action will be subject to approval by the 
Conference at the Annual Meeting. 

f The Committee, through the Endorsing Agent for Military Chaplains, shall report 
to the Board of Directors regarding the endorsement of any ministerial member seek- 
ing to enter the military chaplaincy. 

g. The Committee shall make an annual review of the ministerial activities of those 
with full memberships or licenses to determine the current outreach of the Confer- 
ence and the propriety of continued ministerial status of the members. 

h. The Commitee shall make a careful investigation of those cases where discipline 
may be necessary as ordered by the Constitution (Article V, Sections 3-4). 

6. An Editorial Committee of three to be elected by the Conference on a rotating basis 
for three-year terms. This Committee shall publish a Conference Yearbook annually, a 
Conference Periodical, informational brochures and other necessary and desired litera- 
ture. The Board shall appoint both an Editor and a Media Manager, each for a three-year 
term, to be ex-officio members of this Committee. 

7. A Finance Committee of three to be elected by the Conference on a rotating basis 
for three-year terms. In adddition, the Treasurer and Controller shall serve as ex-officio 
members of this Committee. This Committee shall devise ways and means of providing 
for the financial needs of the Conference, and shall make such financial needs known to 
the constituency. They shall be the Conference's Auditing Committee. 

8. A Foresee Publications Committee of five, three of whose members shall be ap- 
pointed by the Conference Minister and confirmed by the Board of Directors. The other 
two members shall be appointed by the Board of Directors: one to serve as Controller and 
one as Treasurer. All members shall be appointed to three-year terms on a rotating basis. 
The Committee shall oversee the operation of Foresee Publications which exists to serve 
and to promote the Conference by providing churches and individuals with published 
materials and distinctive Conference items. 

9. A Lay Ministry Committee of three to be elected by the Conference on a rotating 
basis for three-year tenns. This Committee shall have the goal of encouraging, equipping, 
and enhancing lay ministry in our Conference and its churches. This goal will be pursued 
by developing and distributing lay ministry resource material, by providing consultation 
services to local churches interested in or engaged in lay ministry and by keeping the 
important role of lay ministry in our churches, both small and large, before the Confer- 
ence. 

121 



10. A Fraternal Relations Committee of three to be elected by the Conference on a 
rotating basis for three-year terms. This Committee shall carry on discussions and rela- 
tions with other like-minded bodies in this country and throughout the world. 

1 1 . A Micronesia Ministries Committee of three and a maximum of six to be appointed 
by the Board of Directors. This Committee shall have the responsibility for the planning 
and promoting of the Brother to Brother ministry in cooperation with the Congregational 
Churches of Micronesia. 

12. A Ministry Committee of three to be elected by the Conference on a rotating basis 
for three-year terms. This Committee shall be concerned with the general well being of 
our member ministers, encouraging their participation in such things as opportunities for 
personal growth and spiritual nurture, mentoring and continuing education, and sound 
health care and retirement programs. It shall also encourage congregations to consider the 
total needs of their pastors when preparing remuneration packages. This Committee shall 
also assist the Conference Minister in developing and maintaining a placement program 
for ministers and churches and shall administer the Ministerial Emergency Fund. 

13. A Missions Committee of a minimum of three and a maximum of six to be appointed 
by the Board of Directors. This Committee shall encourage and stimulate missionary in- 
terests in the local churches by assisting in the development of local missionary programs 
as requested, by suggesting special missionary projects to the Conference such as a united 
offering for world relief, and by encouraging the prayer and financial support of our mem- 
ber missionaries. 

14. A Nominating Committee of five, two to be appointed annually by the Board of 
Directors and three to be elected by the Conference on a rotating basis for three-year 
terms. This Committee shall provide a slate of candidates for the various offices and 
committees. This Committee shall submit a preliminary slate of nominations to the Con- 
ference Minister who shall publish the slate to all Conference members and churches no 
less than thirty days in advance of the Annual Meeting. 

15. A Program Committee of seven members appointed by the Board of Directors to 
prepare for each Annual Meeting. One of the appointees shall be a local arrangements 
chairman. Terms shall begin at the time of appointment and terminate when all affairs for 
each Committee's particular Annual Meeting are resolved. In addition, the Board shall 
appoint an Annual Meeting Coordinator for a three-year term who shall also serve as 
chairman of the Committee. The Committee shall receive assistance from two auxiliary 
committees: 

a. A Children's Committee of three appointed by the Board for each Annual Meet- 
ing. This Committee shall be responsible to provide meaningful activities and nurs- 
ery care for children twelve and under during the Annual Meeting sessions. The 
chairman of the Committee shall be a member of the Program Committee. 

b. A Youth Committee of three appointed by the Board for each Annual Meeting. 
This Committee shall plan for annual youth sessions concurrent to the Annual Meet- 
ing and for such other Conference-wide youth activities that may be feasible. The 
chairman of the Committee shall be a member of the Program Committee. 

16. A Spiritual Life Committee of three to be elected by the Conference on a rotating 
basis for three-year terms. This Committee shall promote the spiritual life of the Confer- 
ence by encouraging the practice of spiritual disciplines that contribute to dynamic Chris- 
tian living. The Committee shall publish the Conference Prayer Calendar and other items 
they deem appropriate. 

17. A Women's Ministries Committee of a minimum of three and maximum of six to 
be elected by the Conference on a rotating basis for three-year terms. This Committee 
shall seek to promote the growth and spiritual welfare of the women of the Conference 
through the planning of the Annual Meeting Ladies' Luncheon and special sessions, through 
enlisting the assistance of regional resource people, and through a yearly outreach project. 
The Committee will seek to provide avenues for publications, correspondence, informa- 
tion for ideas and programs, and adequate funding for its own separate budget through 
contributions from women's groups and individuals. The purpose of this Committee shall 
be to unify in Christ, encourage, strengthen, network, and minister to the needs of the 
women in member and other churches. 

122 



18. A Committee of Area Representatives. This Committee shall be nominated by the 
Conference Minister and confirmed by the Board of Directors for one-year terms, the 
number to be deteiTnined by the Board. The duties of this Committee shall consist of 
acting in the capacity of regional assistants to the Conference Minister. Each member 
shall be assigned a specific area of the country and be responsible for promoting, encour- 
aging, and overseeing the work of the Conference in that area. The Committee shall serve 
under the direction of the Conference Minister. 

The Board of Directors shall appoint such other Committees as deemed necessary. 

IV - Finance 

There is to be no per-capita assessment or apportionment levied by this Conference upon 
the member churches or ministers. The churches and ministers are expected to assume 
voluntarily a share in the financial responsibility of the Conference. 

V - Conference Records 

All records of Conference business in the hands of Conference officials are the property of 
the Conference, contents of which must be made available to authorized Conference offi- 
cials upon request, and which must be delivered to the Conference upon termination of the 
service of officials. 

VI - Ordination to the Christian Ministry 

1 . Ordination to the ministry shall be by a local church, after examination by a council 
called by said church. 

2. A candidate for ordination to the Christian ministry and subsequent ministerial mem- 
bership in this Conference will be expected to have a life which is bearing the fruit of the 
Spirit, and which is marked by deep spirituality and the best of ethical practices. The 
candidate may be disqualified by any habits or practices in his life which do not glorify 
God in his body which belongs to God, or which might cause any brother in Christ to 
stumble. 

3. Every candidate for ordination is encouraged to first apply for Ministerial License. 

4. This Conference recommends that any local church which calls an unordained person 
to its pastorate who does not hold a Ministerial License from this Conference allow a trial 
period of one year before proceeding with his ordination. 

r 

VII - Standards and Membership for Ministry 

1. General Membership Information 

a. A person who applies to this Conference as an Ordained Minister, Licensed Min- 
ister, Commissioned Christian Worker or Lay Preacher shall be required to provide a 
one-time application fee of an amount detennined by the Board of Directors. 

b. Full standing for Ministers and Commissioned Christian Workers shall require 
their attendance at an Annual Meeting. 

c. For applicants seeking Ordained Ministerial standing and having no previous rela- 
tionship with this Conference, a one-year waiting period shall be required. The Cre- 
dentials Committee may grant a ministerial license in the meantime. 

d. Prospective candidates for the ministry, the mission field, and other areas of ser- 
vice are encouraged to apply for Conference Care Membership. 

e. Full standing for Ordained Ministers, Licensed Ministers, Commissioned Chris- 
tian Workers, and students under Conference Care requires that they have member- 
ship in a congregationally governed church. 

f Only an Associate Membership may be granted to those having their credentials 
and/or other membership in a non-congregationally governed body. This Associate 
Membership will carry with it all the privileges of the Conference with the exception 
of holding office, serving on the Board of Directors or Credentials Committee, a com- 
mittee chainnanship, and voting. 

123 



g. Membership cards for Ordained Ministers, Licensed Ministers, Commisioned Chris- 
tian Workers and Lay Preachers shall be issued annually on a calendar year basis 
following the return of the annual questionnaire and a gift of any amount to the 
financial support of the Conference. Refusal to contribute in this way to the financial 
support of the Conference for a period of two consecutive years will result in a review 
by the Credentials Committee and in dismissal should it be shown to be warranted. 

Ordained Ministers, Licensed Ministers, Commissioned Chrisfian Workers and Lay 
Preachers who are inactive in the Conference for a period of two years, during which 
time they do not answer Conference or regional correspondence or questionnaires; do 
not attend any Conference or regional meetings; and do not make any contact what- 
ever with this Conference, shall be contacted if at all possible by the Credentials 
Committee to ascertain their interest in the Conference. If there is no response or no 
interest indicated, the names of such members may be recommended for removal 
fi*om Conference membership by the Credentials Committee at the Annual Meeting. 

h. Ordained Ministers, Licensed Ministers, and Commissioned Christian Workers 
who for a period of two or more years (during one year for Licensed Ministers) fail to 
exercise the functions of the ministry for reasons other than disability or retirement 
and who pursue secular employment with no apparent effort to serve as a pastor or in 
some capacity as a minister (i.e. beyond those activities ordinarily done by laymen) 
shall be questioned by the Credentials Committee as to the propriety of their contin- 
ued standing as a minister or a Commissioned Christian Worker. If such persons 
persist in the neglect of their ministry and refuse to resign from Conference standing 
unless there are extenuating circumstances, the Credentials Committee may recom- 
mend, to any Annual Meeting of the Conference, removal of their membership status 
or transferal to Individual Lay Membership within the Conference. The right to re- 
quest reinstatement upon a return to proper ministry is presumed. 

2. Ordained Ministerial Membership 

a. A Ministerial standing in this Conference shall require: 

(1) A minimum academic attainment of a diploma from an accredited Bible 
institute or the equivalent in formal education or Chrisfian service. However, 
this Conference considers seminary training to be desirable. 

(2) A vocational call to a specific place of service that involves the ministry of 
the Word. 

(3) Acceptable ordination to the Christian ministry. 

(4) Reception into membership in the Conference in the manner provided by the 
Constitution (Article V). 

b. Good and regular standing of ministers shall indicate that they do hold Conference 
membership and are not under disciplinary penalty as a result of charges against 
them. 

3. Licensed Ministerial Membership 

a. Ministerial license to preach conferring authority to perform the regular ftmctions 
of parish ministry, including the solemnization of marriages where legally permis- 
sible, shall be granted by the Conference upon recommendation by the Credentials 
Committee and shall expire with the closing date of the ensuing Annual Meeting of 
the Conference. Such license is renewable at the discretion of the Credenfials Com- 
mittee upon application to its chairman at least thirty days before expirafion of the 
license. 

b. A Licensed Ministerial standing in this Conference shall require: 

(1) A minimum academic attainment of a diploma from an accredited Bible 
instimte or the equivalent education or Christian service. However, this Confer- 
ence considers seminary training to be desirable. 

(2) A call to a particular place of service that involves the ministry of the Word. 

(3) Reception into membership in the Conference in the maimer provided by the 
Constitution (Article V). 

124 



c. Licensed Ministerial standing shall be recognized as valid as long as the licensee is 
actively engaged in an appropriate form of ministry. 

d. Under special circumstances, a student in seminary may be granted Licensed Min- 
isterial standing while performing the functions of a parish ministry. 

e. Licensed Ministerial standing is normally the first step to Ordination and ordained 
Ministerial standing. A license should be held for one year before seeking ordination. 

4. Commissioned Christian Worker Membership 

a. Persons who have been commissioned into a Christian vocation such as a mission- 
ary, tentmaking worker, mission executive or support worker, an editor of a Christian 
periodical, a director of Christian education, a director of evangelism, a minister of 
music, or those who give service within Christian non-profit agencies as a teacher, 
doctor, nurse, or social worker may be received into Conference membership as a 
Commissioned Christian Worker. 

b. Commissioned Christian Worker standing in the Conference shall require: 

( 1 ) A minimum academic attainment of a bachelor's degree from an accredited 
college or university with proven competency in the chosen professional field, 
on-the-job experience may be considered as equivalency for formal training in 
certain cases. 

(2) Acceptable commissioning by a local church into a particular Christian voca- 
tion. This Commission is to be granted after a close and particular examination 
of the candidate's: 

(a) character and conduct, 

(b) physical, mental and education qualifications, 

(c) personal testimony of Christian experience, 

(d) motivation for seeking this standing, 

(e) knowledge of the Bible and Christian theology. 

(3) An engagement or formal invitation to a particular position. 

(4) Reception into membership in the Conference in the manner provided by the 
Constitution (Article V). 

(5) Since commissioning is to a particular vocation, if there is a change in voca- 
tion, there must be a recommissioning. If there is a change in church member- 
ship, then the new church must endorse the commissioning. 

c. Persons called to such Christian vocation other than the ordained ministry and who 
are received into the Conference as Commissioned Christian Workers are entitled to 
all the rights and privileges of the Conference. This status does not grant authority to 
perform the regular functions of parish ministry, including the solemnization of mar- 
riages. 

d. The Commission shall be recognized as valid as long as the Commissioned Chris- 
tian Worker is actively engaged in the form of specific service to which he was com- 
missioned. 

5. Conference Care Membership 

a. Prospective candidates for the ministry, the mission field, and other areas of ser- 
vice such as Christian education, church administration, ministry of music and simi- 
lar areas, may be received under Conference Care for guidance in preparation. Under 
such care the enrollee may study the Conference Study Course. The enroUee shall 
have an annual personal conference with a member of the Credentials Committee or 
with some Conference representative appointed by them. A person who has been 
received under Conference Care is considered a member of the Conference under 
Conference Care and is entitled to vote at all Annual Meetings and special meetings 
of the Conference. His vote does not necessarily have to be included in the delegation 
from his home church, if that church is a member of the Conference. 



125 



b. Conference Care standing may be granted to candidates from foreign countries 
who are resident, and only for so long as they are resident, for study in the United 
States of America. 

6. Lay Preacher Membership 

The Conference shall provide for the status of Lay Preacher upon the application of an 
individual to the Credentials Committee and shall be available only to lay members of the 
Conference. Such status shall be granted for the purpose of recognizing an active lay 
witness of an individual, but it shall not include the privileges of Licensed Ministerial 
standing such as authority granted by the Conference to perfomi the regular functions of a 
pastorate including the solemnization of marriages, and officiating at funerals, baptisms/ 
dedications, and the Lord's Supper. 

The status of Lay Preacher for the individual shall expire with the closing date of the 
ensuing Annual Meeting of the Conference and be renewable at the discretion of the 
Credentials Committee upon application at least thirty days before the expiration of such 
status. 

7. Individual Lay Membership 

This membership shall be granted to members of congregationally governed churches 
which are not members of this Conference. Such Individual Lay Members shall be granted 
the full privilege of Conference membership in accord with the Constitution (Article V, 
Sections 1-4 and Article VII, Section 3). 

An Associate Lay Membership may be granted to individuals who are members of non- 
congregationally governed churches which will carry with it all the privileges of Associate 
status (By-law VII, Section l,f.). 

Vlll-Seal 

The seal of the Conference in use at the time of this Constitutional revision shall continue 
as the official seal of the Conference, and shall be used by having the same, or a facsimile 
thereof, impressed or affixed, or reproduced otherwise. 

IX-Fiscal Year 

The fiscal year of the Conference shall be from January 1 to December 3 1 . 
X-Unprocessed Applications 

Churches, ministers, or individual lay members from non-member churches, whose appli- 
cations for membership have been processed too late to be circulated to the entire Con- 
ference membership before the Annual Meeting, or whose applications are still in pro- 
cess, may be given the right to speak from the floor and/or the right to vote at the said 
Annual Meeting, by a majority vote of the assembled delegates. 

XI-Amendments 

These By-laws may be amended by the affirmative vote of two-thirds of the Conference 
members present and voting at an Annual Meeting or special meeting of the Conference, 
provided that in writing thirty days notice of the substance of proposed amendments to the 
By-laws be given to all members of the Conference. Upon adoption of amendments, the 
orderly numbering, lettering, capitalization and spelling of the By-laws shall be cared for 
by the Constitution Study Committee. 



126 



THE NATURE OF OUR FELLOWSHIP 



STATEMENT 

To include as brothers and sisters those with greatly diverse convictions in certain theo- 
logical areas is not a weakness but a strength and in harmony with Biblical truths. The 
architects of the Congregational Way labored for the freedom to be ruled by God. This 
means that Jesus Christ alone is head of the Church and Lord of the conscience. He directs 
His Church through Scripture, speaking in this manner to officers and individual mem- 
bers. 

This freedom requires an environment of unity and liberty, cultivated in the context of 
honestly differing theological viewpoints. Thus we must seek continually to maintain a 
true balance. To this end, we recognize that as Congregational Christians we do not have 
to agree on everything to achieve Biblical respect and spiritual health. In the spirit of Acts 
15, we seek to promote maximum freedom for the rule of God in our churches. This is the 
merit of the Congregational conscience. 

We do not claim that the theological breadth of our Conference today is a precise exten- 
sion of all the doctrines of the Savoy Declaration of 1658. But we do consider it significant 
that Browne's "Statement of Congregational Principles" antedates Savoy by 76 years and 
that the latter was itself a modification of the Westminster Confession including a more 
flexible view of the role of creeds. According to these historic Congregational principles, 
each church is complete in itself and independent from every other. Thus, there is no 
appeal from the decisions of the local church. 

Consequently, we believe that the Biblical fellowship offered by us today meets a need for 
fellowship among congregationally governed churches and is the outgrowth of the Congre- 
gational principles of 300 years ago. If those principles are seen as Biblical, then our 
current relationships deserve the name Congregational, for they appeal to the same 
ecclesiology. And, how relevant this is: we offer real freedom at a time when it is being 
lost almost everywhere else. 

There is freedom in the CCCC today to believe and practice the strictest Reformed theol- 
ogy of our early fathers, as well as other essentially Christian theology which differs in 
certain ways from the Reformation perspective. Should either be denied in a forced unity, 
contrary to the ecclesiology of the original founders, we would no longer be fully Congre- 
gational. 



CONCLUSION 

Today we are faced with lawlessness and legalism not only in our society but in many 
Christian churches. To maintain both freedom and unity is difficult, but worthwhile. The 
task of being a true Congregationalist was never easy but always a source of blessing. 



127 



CODE OF ETHICS FOR MINISTERS 

In My Own Life 

I will always devote time to seeking the will of God through reading the Scriptures and 
prayer. 

I will endeavor to keep myself physically and emotionally fit. 
I will seek in all ways to be Christlike in my attitude and conduct. 
I will seek mutual accountability and spiritual friendship with fellow Christians for per- 
sonal encouragement and nurture in order to ensure faithfulness to my calling as a stead- 
fast follower and competent servant of my Lord Jesus Christ. 

In Relationship to My Family 

I will consider each member of my immediate family as precious gifts from God, and will 

careftiUy, lovingly and responsibly meet their needs as a sacred obligation before Him. 

I will give spiritual leadership in my home. 

I will be faithftil and loyal to my family members, loving them as Jesus Christ loves His 

Church. 

In Relationship to the Church 

I will remember that I am called to lead, but also to serve. 

I will never violate a confidence given to me. 

I will be diligent in my duties as pastor, never lazy, but with God as my judge and my 

Shepherd. 

I will be Biblical in my preaching, presenting the whole counsel of God, speaking the truth 

in love. 

I will strive to introduce people to Christ, and to build His Church. 

I will consider my call to the church a sacred responsibility and stand by the decision. 

I will seek the unity of the church and resist any attempts to divide. 

In Relationship to Other Ministers 

I will be a brother in Christ to my fellow ministers. 

I will not seek to build my church at the expense of another church, nor my ego at the 

expense of another minister. 

I will not speak uncharitably of either my predecessor or my successor. 

I will refrain from pastoral contacts with former parishioners except with the knowledge 

of the present pastor. 

In Relationship to the Conference 

I will participate in the larger fellowship of the Conservative Congregational Christian 
Conference, and seek to support through prayer and action its aims and objectives. 

In Relationship to the Community 

I will seek to be responsible in my personal finances. 

I will seek to build a positive relationship with the community without sacrificing my 

ministry to the church. 



128 



CODE OF ETHICS FOR CHURCHES 

The Christian Church is the Body of Christ and is destined to be His Bride. Inasmuch as 
every local church is an expression of the whole Body it is needful for her to be committed 
to vigilance in all of her relationships: 

In Relationship to Christ 

Believing that Jesus Christ is the Head of the Church... 

We will honor and exalt Him in all of our relationships and ministries. We will keep 
ourselves free from all policies and practices which might tend to mar the beauty of the 
Bride of Christ. 

In Relationship to Fellow-Members 

Believing that the local church is an expression of the family of God... 
We will promote unity among the members of the congregation, resisting all jealousy, 
rivalry, self-seeking and division which would disturb that unity. 

We will "... make every effort to do what leads to peace and to mutual edification." (Ro- 
mans 14:19) 

In Relationship to Other Churches 

Believing that the Church is a universal body... 

We will attempt to maintain honorable relationships with other churches in the commu- 
nity. 

In Relationship to the Community 

Believing that the witness of the church in the community affects the ministry of that 
church to the community and reflects on Christ, the Head of the Church... 
We will endeavor to keep our dealings with agencies, businesses and individuals in the 
community honest and above reproach. 

In Relationship to the Conference 

Believing that our membership in the Conservative Congregational Christian Conference 

is not only a privilege but also involves responsibility... 

We will fulfill our fellowship, ministry and financial obligations to the Conference to the 

best of our ability. 

We will uphold the doctrines and principles of the Conference. 

In Relationship to the Pastor and Other leaders of the Church 

Believing that the pastor and other spiritual leaders are shepherds of Christ's flock... 
We will love, honor and submit to them as they, by example and word, watch over our 
souls. 

We will support the pastor financially so that he may be able to meet his obligations 
without bringing reproach upon himself or us. 

We will not allow anything among us that would undermine the pastor's ministry or rob 
him of the confidence of the church and the community. 

We will endeavor to respond to all criticism dealing with the pastor, other spiritual lead- 
ers, or their families in an honorable manner, not tolerating subversive or clandestine 
meetings. 

Whenever legitimate criticism or charges against anyone arise, we will follow Scriptural 
direction for church discipline, always with a desire for reconciliation and restoration and 
always making use of the cloak of love. 



129 



STATEMENT REGARDING 
MINISTERIAL STANDING OF WOMEN 

The Conservative Congregational Christian Conference affirms certain doctrines and prin- 
ciples as basic to its existence and, therefore, non-negotiable in its practice. Among these 
are its commitment to the full Divine inspiration and authority of the Bible; the autono- 
mous polity of our local churches; and the importance of maintaining unity without deny- 
ing diversity. Each of these three affirmations has been considered as vital to our position 
with regard to the ministerial standing of women in our Conference. 



A significant amount of study has been done by evangelicals on this subject in recent 
years. It appears evident to us that Christians, equally committed to the authority of Holy 
Scripture, may disagree on whether or not the Scriptures allow for the ordination of women. 
We recognize that some defenders of women's ordination do so upon principles which 
sacrifice Biblical authority. We in no way support such efforts. We affirm that persons who 
are firmly committed to the authority of God's Word, though they differ in their interpreta- 
tions of the Word on this subject, are welcome to hold their convictions with clear con- 
science within our fellowship. 



No church, within our Conference, is required to teach and practice a viewpoint, with 
regard to ordaining women, which is against the conviction of that particular assembly. 
Each congregation ordains whom it freely chooses, thus preserving its own autonomy. 
Whoever is duly ordained in a local church, whether male or female, may apply to the 
CCCC Credentials Committee and, if qualified, be recognized as ordained. This should 
not be understood as Conference approval nor disapproval of the ordination of women, but 
rather as recognition of the conscientious action of an autonomous congregation. 



We urge, in this issue as in others, that members of the Conference relate to one another in 
a spirit of love and unity. Members are not asked to compromise their own convictions, but 
are asked to respect the right of others, who are also devoted to the Head of the Church and 
to His Word, to hold their own convictions as well. 



130 



RACIAL RECONCILIATION 

Preamble 

"After this I looked and there before me was a great multitude that no one could count, 
from every nation, tribe, people and language, standing before the throne and in front of 
the Lamb" (Revelation 7:9). The Conservative Congregational Christian Conference 
(CCCC) embraces this glorious hope of all the people of God, which is the Church of Jesus 
Christ. 

Christ's desire is for "those who will believe in me. ..that all of them may be one. Father, 
just as you are in me and I am in you" (John 17:20,21 ). The Good Shepherd expressed His 
compassionate desire for His Church when He said, "I have other sheep that are not of this 
flock, I must bring them also. They too will listen to my voice, and there shall be one flock 
and one shepherd." (John 10:16) 

The need for worldwide racial reconciliation is great. The sins of prejudice, bigotry, rac- 
ism and ethnocentrism in all their sinful manifestations exist both individually and insti- 
tutionally. The lethal combination of prejudice plus power creates racial discrimination in 
all its depravity. The solution is found only in the atoning death of Jesus Christ and His 
Church, whom He calls to be ambassadors of reconciliation in the world (II Corinthians 
5:15-21; Galatians 3:28). 

Moreover, Congregationalists have historically been courageous in speaking out against 
the godless practice of racism. For example, nineteenth century abolitionist Lewis Tappan, 
a Congregationalist layman, declared: "Abolitionism is a belief that American slavery is a 
crime against man and a sin against God.. .it is a duty to do all we lawfully and scripturally 
can for its overthrow." We are called to the same kind of Biblical courage today! Christ's 
call to reconciliation between brothers and sisters will require courage and obedience 
(Matthew 5:23,24). 

Scriptural Considerations 

God's written Word declared that all people are sinners by nature; and given the opportu- 
nity, sinners by choice (Romans 5:12-21; 3:9-12). This common sinful rebellion has es- 
tranged us from our Creator; and no effort of our own is able to reconcile us to our God, 
who alone is the giver of eternal life (John 3:16-18; Titus 3:5). God, in His gracious mercy 
and love, sent His only Son, Jesus Christ, to die on the cross in payment for our sins 
(Romans 5:6-8). All who repent and believe in Him have been bom again and are thus 
forgiven and have gained the right to be called God's children (John 1:12). In this gracious 
action, those who were once at enmity with God have been reconciled to Him (Acts 3:19- 
26; Romans 5:9-11; 8:12-17; II Corinthians 5:14-21). 

Sin not only separates us from God; it also divides us from one another. As such, we 
understand racial and ethnic enmity as a tragic expression of universal human sinfulness 
(Galatians 5:19-21). Yet, we must affirm that just as we are dependent upon God for our 
creation and redemption, so He alone is the source of all peace, reconciliation, and fellow- 
ship between people. The apostle Paul teaches that the cross of Christ has taken away the 
"enmity" and the "middle wall of partition" between Jew and Gentile believers (Ephesians 
2:14,15). This includes removal of the historical barriers to God's saving grace, as well as 
the enmity which had previously existed between these disparate groups (Ephesians 2:1 1- 
22. Cf. John 4:1-42; Romans 1 1:12-21; I John 4:7-1 1). 

This is a very challenging and transforming truth. It exposes the sinful attitudes and preju- 
dices that human beings have toward peoples not like themselves. The Acts of the Apostles 
traces the achievements and struggles of those called to testify to the Gospel truth that 
God, in His grace, "shows no partiality" (Acts 10:9-48; 15:1-21; 28:25-29. Cf Matthew 
28:19). This same grace proved a stumbling block for Peter as illustrated when Paul re- 
buked him for withdrawing from the fellowship of his Gentile brethren (Galatians 2:1 1- 
12). 



131 



Implementation 

Therefore, the CCCC is committed to responding to Christ's desire for unity among His 
disciples as expressed in John 17:22 and by reflecting the diversity of the Bride of Christ 
depicted in Revelation 7:9. To give substance to this commitment requires a continuous, 
concerted effort. Therefore the CCCC will pursue the following strategies and goals. 

1. We will renounce and decry the sins of prejudice, bigotry, racism 
and ethnocentrism in all their sinful manifestations, individually and 
institutionally. We affirm there is one human race, and so any arbi- 
trary attributing of particular status based upon color, culture or other 
characteristics is contrary to the grace of God demonstrated in His 
making "the two one new man." When individuals or societies act 
upon such false distinctions, they perpetuate the sin of racism. 

2. The CCCC recognizes the need to evangelize the entire spectrum of 
American culture, including the fastest growing segment of our popu- 
lation in our urban centers. Our Conference is called to serve all people 
groups whether in cities, towns, villages, Indian reservations or tem- 
porary quarters that house migrant farm workers. Therefore, we will 
identify, call and support gifted persons to: 

a. Recruit seminarians into Conference Care who are called 
to serve in urban settings and among minority people groups 
upon graduation. 

b. Seek to bring unaffiliated urban and other churches into 
the Conference. 

c. Facilitate networking between urban churches and Con- 
ference ministries. 

d. Stimulate church multiplication in urban and other areas, 
specifically reaching out to minority communities. 

3. We will schedule workshops at our Annual Meetings that address 
urban multicultural ministry issues. 

In these ways, we believe the Conference will be reaching out in the spirit of the Great 
Commission in order to make disciples of ALL nations. 



132 



STATEMENT REGARDING 
THE CHARISMATIC MOVEMENT 



PREAMBLE 



Frequently, the Board of Directors is asked questions regarding the position of the CCCC 
with respect to the Charismatic Movement and particularly the matter of glossolalia. 

The Conference as a body would find it difficult, because of our congregational structure, 
to make a definitive policy statement. However, the Board of Directors wishes to present 
this simple statement as a product of its thinking and with the desire that the "Unity of the 
body" be maintained. 

A STATEMENT 

It is our conviction that the plain teaching of the New Testament is that the more spectacu- 
lar sign gifts, i.e., tongues, healings and miracles, needed some degree of order that would 
prevent their indiscriminate use (I Cor. 14:40). It appears that the Apostle Paul taught that 
the more spectacular gifts were secondary to those that instructed believers in faith and 
morals and that evangelized non-Christians (I Cor. 12:28-31). Tongue speaking was cer- 
tainly not forbidden (I Cor. 14:39), but intelligent exposition of the Word of God, along 
with instruction in faith and duty was definitely superior. 



Therefore, we desire that in the life of our Conference there be neither evangelism on 
behalf of the spectacular gifts nor forbidding thereof So that there be no confusion relat- 
ing to our position, we give the following examples: 

a. To use either the Annual Meeting or regional gatherings for the promoting of these 
spectacular gifts is not in order as it will engender division. 

b. To use either the Annual Meeting or regional gatherings as platforms to antagonize 
members by denouncing these gifts is also out of order. 

"That there should be no schisms in the body; but that the members should have the same 
care one for another." (I Cor. 12:25). 

CONCLUSION 

We respect those who hold to the view that the sign gifts were withdrawn when the canon 
of Scripture was closed. We also respect those who hold that these same gifts are still 
among us today. However, we are firm in our belief that messages received by means of 
these gifts are not equal to the revelation of God in Holy Scripture. 



133 



POLICY AND GUIDELINES FOR THE CREDENTIALS 

COMMITTEE 
REGARDING MINISTERS WHO ARE DIVORCED 

I. STATEMENT OF THE ISSUE 

The presence of divorce in American life today together with the increasing incidence of 
divorce among the clergy confronts our Conference, and particularly our Credentials Com- 
mittee, with the issue of ministers who have been divorced being granted admission and 
continued standing in the Conference. It is necessary, therefore, to set forth policy guide- 
lines for the consideration of divorce situations. 



A. SANCTITY OF MARRIAGE 

It is an accepted fact in our Conference that the Scriptures are the standard by which 
guidelines should be determined. In this light the sanctity of marriage cannot be 
overemphasized. When asked His view on divorce, Jesus replied, "Haven't you read 
that at the beginning the Creator 'made them male and female' and said, 'For this 
reason a man will... be united to his wife and the two will become one flesh?' So they 
are no longer two but one. Therefore what God has joined together, let not man 
separate." (Matthew 19:4, Genesis 2:24) 

God instituted marriage. It is not subject to the changing norms of society. God de- 
signed marriage to be a permanent union of a man and woman by which they are 
made one. God did not allow for divorce in his design. Marriage is a total commit- 
ment of two people to one another for life. It is a covenant of companionship. 

In the light of Proverbs 2:17 and Malachi 2:14, marriage is a covenant relationship 
before God, and the breaking of a covenant of whatever kind is wrong. Sin is in- 
volved in every divorce. According to Malachi 2:16 God hates divorce. That is not to 
say that God hates people who are divorced, nor is it to say that everyone who is 
divorced is guilty of the sin that resulted in divorce. Some people are divorced by 
their mates against their will and in spite of their efforts toward preservation of the 
marriage. This raises the question whether divorce per se disqualifies a minister 
from continued standing in or acceptance into membership in the Conference. 

B. SANCTITY OF THE MINISTRY 

Even though it might be allowed that divorce in itself may not eliminate a man from 
the ministry, it must be remembered that, in the light of Scripture the sanctity of the 
office of the ministry and the example of the minister cannot be overemphasized. 
Paul wrote to Timothy, "If a man desire the office of a bishop, he desireth a good 
work. A bishop then must be blameless..." (I Timothy 3:1-2). The sacred nature of the 
office is emphasized by Paul when he says in I Corinthians 4: 1 , "Let a man so account 
of us, as of the ministers of Christ, and the stewards of the mysteries of God." To 
Titus he wrote, "A bishop must be blameless, as the steward of God; not selfwilled, 
not soon angry, not given to wine, no striker, not greedy of filthy lucre; but a lover of 
hospitality, a lover of good men, sober, just, holy, temperate, holding fast the faithful 
word as he hath been taught..." (Titus 1:7-9). In other words, the life of a minister 
must be exemplary in every way because of the high office which he represents, "in 
all things showing himself a pattern of good works." (Titus 2:7) 

Peter admonishes ministers to "feed the flock... taking oversight thereof ... not ... as 
lords over God's heritage, but being examples to the flock." (I Peter 5:2,3), and Paul 
reminds ministers that "we are ambassadors for Christ," standing in Christ's stead. 



134 



Because of the sanctity and high calling of the ministry, therefore, and because it 
places the minister before the Church and the world as a pattern of what Christian 
living should be, the divorce of a minister is an extremely serious matter. Even though 
the minister himself may be innocent of wrongdoing, his divorce can have disastrous 
and far reaching effects on his congregation and his future ministry. 

II. UNITY WITH DIVERSITY IN THE INTERPRETATION OF SCRIPTURE 

At this point we must recognize that, within the unity of our Conference, there is diversity. 
We are united in our conviction that the Bible is God's Word and our ultimate authority, 
but there are areas of Biblical interpretation where our understanding differs. For ex- 
ample, we all accept the sovereignty of God but we have differences of understanding how 
God's sovereignty relates to man's freedom and responsibility. Likewise we unite in ex- 
pecting the return of our Lord but we differ as to the sequence of events associated with 
His sure return. The same can be said regarding the charismatic gifts and the place of 
women in the ministry. In the same manner we agree on the evil of divorce but we do not 
all understand the teaching of Jesus and other Scriptures on divorce in exactly the same 
way. 

A. UNEQUIVOCAL DISQUALIPICATION 

There are members of our Conference who are strong in their conviction that any 
minister who is divorced for whatever reason is thereby disqualified to serve in the 
ministry and should not have standing as a minister of the Conference nor be pastor 
of a church. Paul's words, "The overseer (minister) must be above reproach, the 
husband of but one wife.." (I Timothy 3:2), are understood as requiring the disquali- 
fication of a divorced minister. The situation is compounded if the minister has mar- 
ried the second time. The teaching of Jesus in Luke 16:18, Matthew 5:31,32 and 
Matthew 19:1-9 is taken by some to mean that, while divorce is wrong, an exception 
is allowed in the case of fornication, but the exception does not leave the innocent 
party free to serve in the ministry or to remarry. 

B. FORGIVENESS AND RECONCILIATION 

Some members of the Conference, however, hold other considerations, which they 
believe are also valid in the light of the Bible. For example, there is the principle of 
God's forgiveness and restoration. What shall we say of the man who was divorced 
before his conversion to Christ when he was made a new creature in Christ? If he had 
been guilty of sexual sin before becoming a Christian he would not thereby be ineli- 
gible for a call from God to the ministry. Paul was guilty of murder and blasphemy 
before his conversion but God forgave him and made him a minister. There are men 
who have been saved out of a life of immorality and debauchery who have become 
able ministers of the Gospel. Is the breaking of the marriage covenant a greater sin 
than pre-marital promiscuity? When God forgives sin He casts them behind His back 
(Isaiah 38:17). He casts them into the depths of the sea (Micah 7:19). He remembers 
them no more (Jeremiah 31 :34), and He removes them as far as the east is from the 
west (Psalm 103:12). God forgives the sins we confess and cleanses us from all 
unrighteousness (I John 1:9). Some members of our Conference would say, "Yes, God 
does forgive and forget, but the divorced minister still should not serve in the public 
office of the ministry." Other members of the Conference would say, "When God 
forgives the truly penitent sinner; whatever the sin, he wipes the slate clean. Should 
we continue to call the man unclean and unworthy of service if God has pardoned him 
and made him clean? Is there any reason why God's assurances of forgiveness should 
apply to every other sin except divorce? Divorce is not the unpardonable sin." 



135 



C. RELEASE FROM THE MARRIAGE COVENANT 

Consider also the case of the minister who has not been guilty of disruption of his 
marriage by unchristian attitudes and conduct which have driven his wife to seek 
divorce, and who has made every effort toward reconciliation and the saving of his 
marriage. If his wife persists in "putting him away" by divorce, he is in no way guilty 
of violating God's law. If both he and his wife are Christians, he should remain 
unmarried and continue to seek reconciliation according to I Corinthians 7:11. If he 
fails to do so, his eligibility to continue in the ministry is severely damaged if not 
destroyed. 

If, however, the wife has proven herself to be an unbeliever in the above situation, 
according to I Corinthians 7:15 the minister "is not bound," and if he is not bound, he 
is free. He has been released from the marriage covenant. There is a parallel to this in 
Romans 7:2,3 where Paul declares that a woman is "bound to her husband as long as 
he is alive... But if he dies, she is released from the law and is not an adulteress 
though she marries another man." In Romans 7 the death of the husband terminates 
the marriage and in I Corinthians 7 the willful departure of the unbeliever terminates 
the marriage. The sense of I Corinthians 7 appears to be that a person who has sin- 
cerely sought to preserve a marriage but has been divorced contrary to his will and 
effort toward reconciliation is a free person. In such a case it is a valid conclusion of 
some that a minister should not be penalized and prevented from serving in the min- 
istry solely because he has been divorced. Some ministers in such cases have contin- 
ued to enjoy the blessing of God on their ministry. 

D. LAWFUL - BUT NOT EXPEDIENT 

Having said all this, we need to recognize that the traumatic experience of going 
through a divorce and the possible attitudes of a minister's present and future congre- 
gations may quite possibly make it very difficult, if not actually impossible, to carry 
on an effective ministry. The minister, the congregation and the Credentials Commit- 
tee will do well to consider that while, in the view of many members of our Confer- 
ence, it may be lawful for a divorced minister to continue to serve in the ministry, it 
might not be expedient. He might better devote his talents, training and experience to 
some service for the Lord other than the pulpit and pastoral ministry, such as writing, 
counseling or administration. 

III. CONFERENCE RESPONSIBILITY 

In the light of the above considerations, we must keep in mind that the Conference does 
not speak for the local church or for the individual minister or member of the Conference. 

A. DETERMINATION BY THE LOCAL CONGREGATION 

Every church determines for itself what its practice shall be regarding divorce. Every 
church has complete freedom and responsibility to make sure that the minister it calls 
to lead the congregation shall be in harmony with its own standards regarding di- 
vorce. In making referrals to churches seeking ministers, the Conference office shall 
always provide the full resume and record of a minister including his marital status. 
Churches may differ in their views of divorce, but we are bound together in our 
Conference by our common commitment to the heart essentials of our Christian faith 
as stated in our Articles of Faith. 



B. ACCEPTANCE OF THE VARIOUS BIBLICAL INTERPRETATIONS 

The views of our ministers vary in some areas other than the cardinal truths set forth 
in our constitution. In those areas where we differ the conscience of the individual 



136 



minister is not compromised by the position expressed by the Conference in such 
areas as eschatology, the charismatic movement, women's part in the ministry, di- 
vorce, or any other area. On the other hand, the Conference and the Credentials 
Committee must recognize that born-again Bible-believing, evangelical Christians 
and ministers within the Conference will have differing convictions which they de- 
rive from their understanding of Scripture. 

We must make allowance for such varying convictions and make a place for the brother 
whose views differ from our own as long as he does not deny the fundamental truths 
of the Bible. We must also be careful not to impose the convictions of any one man, 
church or segment of the Conference on any minister, church or the Conference as a 
whole. In Christian love we must accept one another and respect the privacy of 
everyone's conscience before God. 

C. OBLIGATION OF THE CREDENTIALS COMMITTEE 

Finally, let it be said that the Credentials Committee is under obligation to exercise 
extreme care in considering the divorce of a minister of the Conference or one who is 
applying for membership. The Committee's actions must proceed prayerfully with 
compassion toward the individual and with due regard to the high standards of the 
ministry set forth in Scripture. 

All who experience divorce shall enter a period of review. Unrepentant persons caus- 
ing the dissolution of their marriage will be dismissed from ministerial membership 
in a manner consistent with the CCCC constitution and by-laws. Other ministers 
shall have their credentialed status suspended for a period of review, the length of 
which is determined by the Credentials Committee. I Timothy 5:22 gives caution 
regarding the hasty laying on of hands, a principle which should not only apply to the 
novice or those who newly apply for CCCC standing, but also to those who experi- 
ence divorce while pursuing an active ministry within our fellowship. In taking this 
approach, we recognize that Conference actions do not bind a local church in its 
decision to continue a pastoral relationship with a divorced minister. 

After this review period, the Credentials Committee will, upon request, examine or 
re-examine the general trends of ministerial personal fitness as outlined in I Timothy 
3:1-7. Personal references from those who know the individual's current home situa- 
tion will be sought. If the individual is "well thought of by outsiders" then his creden- 
tials would be returned as a positive endorsement. It is believed that such a vouching 
process would prove to be both a source of encouragement for the individual and a 
source of confidence for churches that may consider this individual as a prospective 
candidate for pastoral office. 



137 



HOMOSEXUALS AND THE 
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 



Our aim in the following statement is to combine theological thinking and Biblical com- 
mitment with contemporary understanding and compassionate pastoral concern. 

1 . God in His Holy Word plainly condemns the practice of homosexuality 
as an abomination in His sight (Leviticus 18:22), 
as a degrading and unnatural passion (Romans 1:26,27), 
as one that brings grave consequences in this life, and 
as a sin that, if persisted in, will exclude one from the Kingdom of God 
(I Corinthians 6:9,10). 

Therefore, neither individual Christians, nor ministers of the Word of God, nor congrega- 
tions of the Lord Jesus Christ, may take away from or lessen God's prohibition of and 
warnings against the practice of homosexuality. 

Neither may they individually or collectively as responsible citizens in a free society, urge 
or concede that the State should give special protection or approval to this practice, or 
promote it as a matter or personal taste, free choice, or "sexual orientation." Homosexuals 
are not entitled to special treatment under the law. That would be tantamount to rewarding 
evil. 



2. The Apostle Paul testifies that those once involved in homosexuality were among those 
who were washed, sanctified, and justified in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ (I 
Corinthians 6:11). 

Therefore, individual Christians, ministers and congregations, understanding that all hu- 
man beings are sinners, and that as Christians we have received God's mercy while help- 
less, ungodly and hostile to God (Romans 3:23;5:6,10), must warn against homosexual 
practices as from the mouth of the Lord (Ezekiel 3:17), and, at the same time proclaim 
forgiveness, cleansing, restoration, and power for godly living for all who repent and be- 
lieve the Gospel (John 1:12;3:16; Romans 1:16; 1 Corinthians 6:11; Philippians 2:13). 

We specifically renounce any unbiblical prejudice against persons who are homosexual 
simply because of their orientation, which is just one particular form of the same sinful 
orientation we all have. But we do believe that every expression of that orientation is 
sinful, just as every expression of adulterous desire is sinful, and we believe that all 
practicing adulterers and homosexuals should be called to repentance. 

3. God desires that all mankind repent and come to a knowledge of the truth and be saved 
(II Peter 3:9; 1 Timothy 2:4). 

Therefore, individual Christians, ministers and congregations, will compassionately and 
in love, proclaim the Good News of forgiveness and the admonition to go and sin no more 
(John 8:11) to those once involved in homosexual practices, admitting such into fellow- 
ship after confession of faith and evidence of repentance, as with all those who have 
sinned grievously in other ways (1 Corinthians 6:1 1). We counsel those homosexuals who 
do not experience flill healing and reorientation to remain celibate, trusting the Holy Spirit 
to give a joyous and fruitful existence as is promised to believers who cannot experience 
marriage (Isaiah 56:3-5). Jesus repeats this promise (Matthew 19:12). 



138 



STATEMENT ON ABORTION 

PREAMBLE 

Christians affirm that human yearning for reahty and meaning can be satisfied only by the 
knowledge of and a relationship with a personal God who alone can change human nature 
and liberate from the bondage of self-indulgence'. Human worth is a consequence of being 
made by and in the image of a personal God- - who is sovereign over history and places us 
within the framework of God's continual acts in history.^ 

The dominant philosophy of this age opposes this world and life view and asserts the 
dignity and worth of people and their capacity for self-realization through reason apart 
from the supernatural and sovereign involvement of a personal God.^ 

Clear lines of confrontation between these two opposing faiths are not always easily dis- 
cerned by the Christian community, both individually and corporately. Cultural condition- 
ing, ignorance of God's revealed will and sin all mitigate against a clear perception of 
many ethical and moral issues. Nevertheless, we affirm the authority and witness of God's 
revelation in Scripture and the heritage of Church history regarding the dignity and sanc- 
tity of all human life and oppose anything that would blur or lessen its value.^ 

We humbly recognize the complex presuppositions, realities and implications of ethical/ 
moral decision-making and confess our own sinful silence in failing to act where the lines 
of conflict are obvious.^ We accept the challenge to confront the pragmatism of this age 
and seek to move away from past indifferences and the subtle seductive power of this age.^ 
We, therefore, affirm that abortion on demand for reasons such as personal convenience, 
social adjustment, economic advantage, genetic defect, or physical malformation is mor- 
ally wrong.^ 

STATEMENT 



We believe that all human life is a gift from God and is therefore sacred.'' The Lord has 
created all life sacred and cherishes all lives: including all those which have been marked 
by the effects of the fall of nature, resulting in physical and mental abnormalities.'" We 
believe that God has told us, in Scripture, what our attitude should be towards the un- 
born." Specific blessings have been conferred upon unborn infants, pre-eminently in the 
incarnation of Jesus Christ.'" Scripture clearly states that God provided penalties for ac- 
tions which result in the death of the unborn.'^ The fetus is not a growth or piece of tissue 
in the mother's body, nor even a potential human being, but a human life who, though not 
yet mature, is growing into the fullness of the humanity it already possesses. '■* The human- 
ness of the fetus is confirmed by modem medical science. From the moment of conception 
a unique genetic code distinct from both parents is established, sex is determined and the 
only requirements for development into an adult human being are time and nutrition. 

Thus, we affirm that the moral issue of abortion is more than a question of the freedom of 
a woman to control the reproductive functions of her body. It is a question of moral respon- 
sibility involving at least two human beings at different stages of maturity. Abortion tran- 
scends issues of personal, economic and social convenience or compassion. No woman 
gives birth to herself She gives birth to a child that is a distinct body and personality from 
herself Consequently, even if we agree that every woman has a right to do with her own 
body as she sees fit,'^ we cannot conclude that she therefore has the right to take the life of 
her child. However, in the rare situation when the life of the unborn child mortally threat- 
ens the equal life of the mother, the mother is not required to sacrifice her life."' 

We believe that the Church is commissioned to declare and demonstrate this high regard 
for human life, the reality and complexity of the sinful human condition and God's for- 



139 



giveness through grace and the redemptive work of Jesus Christ.'^ The community of Chris- 
tian behevers furnishes the context out of which this declaration and demonstration grow.'^ 
It is the responsibihty of the Church to insist that society not adopt a pohcy that would 
deny the sanctity of human life and lead people to take life lightly. The Church must 
advocate the protection of the freedom of those who cannot protect themselves. The Church 
must therefore seek to protect the unborn child's freedom to live.'^ In addition. Christians 
must reach out to those who are confronted with the crisis for which abortion seems a 
solution with the offer of a Biblical alternative, providing the practical care and compas- 
sion needed.^° 



CONCLUSION 

The Gospel of Jesus Christ is the only adequate answer to the terrible spiritual, moral and 
social dilemma confronting the society that legalizes abortion and the parents contemplat- 
ing abortion. Christians are called to live in active tension with culture, neither becoming 
complacent toward evil nor proponents of it but promoting the truth of God's revelation."' 
The current state of affairs in our society compels Christians to share in the responsibility 
for the tragedy upon us, to promote justice and propagate the promises of grace." Chris- 
tians have a responsibility to be involved in the legislative process of our democratic 
society for the purpose of guarding the freedom of the unborn. The Church also has the 
obligation to educate its own constitutents and society itself concerning the complex is- 
sues surrounding abortion and equip people with a Biblical alternative.^^ God has commis- 
sioned the Church to experience and express the redemption that is available in Christ 
Jesus. Therefore, it is precisely to those who are in trouble and despair that the Church has 
to present the message of forgiveness and redemption. Even those who have sinned must 
be sheltered by Christian love and assured that no one is beyond the scope of God's for- 
giveness.'-^ The Church must also create alternatives and share the burden of caring for the 
lives of those brought into the world under difficult circumstances.-'' May God's grace and 
wisdom prevail as we seek to work for an end to abortion. 

INDEX OF SCRIPTURE REFERENCES 

(l.)Phil. 3:8-11; I Cor. 6:9-11 (2.) Ps. 139:14; Gen. 1:26,27 

(3.)Job38:4;Is.9:6,7; 1 1:1-9; 46:9,10; (4.) Gen. 4:11,12; Rom. 1:18-32; 

Ps. 72:1-11; 2 Pet. 3:11-14 I Cor. 1:18-20; 2:14 

(5.) Prov. 14:34; 29:18; Mt. 28:18,20 (6.) Prov 24:11,12 

(7.) Eph. 2:2; 2 Cor. 4:3,4 (8.) Ex. 20:13 

(9.)Ps. 127:3; 139:13-16 (10.) Ex. 4:11; Jn.9:l-3 

(11.) Ex. 21:22,23 (NIV) (12.)Jer. l:5;Lk. l:15;Gal. 1:15; 

Mt. 1:20 

(13.) Ex. 21:22-25 (14.) Job 10:8a,10-12 

(15.) 1 Cor. 6:13b,19,20 (16.) Ex. 22:2,3; Jn. 15:12,13 

(17.) Ps. 32:1,2; Rom. 5:1,6-11 (18.) I Jn. 3:11-22 

(19.) Mt. 25:40,45; 28:18-20; (20.) Jas.l:27; 2:14-17; Ps. 106:3 

Prov. 24:1 1,12; Amos 5:15,24 

(21.) Mt. 5:10-16; Heb. 11:36-38 (22.) Gen 1:28a; Mt. 28:18-20; 

Mk. 16:15 

(23.) 1 Tim. 1:8-11 (24.) Hos. 4:1-6 

(25.) 1 Jn. 1:9; Mk. 3:28 (26.) Jas. 1:27; 2:14-17; I Jn. 3:17 



140 



STATEMENT REGARDING 
EUTHANASIA AND ASSISTED SUICIDE 



Reason for this Statement 

The Conservative Congregational Christian Conference has consistently affirmed that all 
human life is a gift from God and is therefore sacred. This principle applies to life from 
the moment of conception to the moment of death. Modem society is increasingly faced 
with questions regarding individual autonomy in relation to both how people choose to 
live and how they choose to die. We of the Conservative Congregational Christian Confer- 
ence believe that God's written Word teaches principles which provide clear guidance in 
making decisions about life and death. We maintain that the continuum of life, from 
conception to the moment of death, should be lived in obedience to God's Holy Word. 



Definition of Terms 

1. Euthanasia literally means "good death", derived from the Greek "eu" (good) and 
"thanatos" (death). Euthanasia is generally considered in two distinct forms: 

a. Active Euthanasia is generally defined as the intentional bringing about of an easy 
and painless death to a person suffering from an incurable or painful disease. Active 
euthanasia is the direct and intentional killing of one human being by another as a 
deliberate act of commission. 

b. Passive Euthanasia is generally defined as the cessation or withholding of the em- 
ployment of extraordinary measures which would artificially prolong physical life when 
there is believed to be irrefutable evidence that life without such measures cannot long 
continue. Passive euthanasia may be considered an act of omission by refiising to sus- 
tain life through technology or by other means. 

2. Assisted Suicide is generally defined as the intentional intervendon by any individual 
with the intent to produce the death of another individual; in this context, often considered 
for the purpose of relieving pain and suffering. 

3. Physician Assisted Suicide is generally defined as a physician offering assistance with 
the intended purpose of either hastening death or terminating a person's life through the 
actions involved in one or both of the following roles: 

a. providing information about how to commit suicide in an effective manner; 

b. providing the means necessary for an effective suicide; which may include writing a 
prescription for a lethal amount of medication, providing moral support for an individual's 
decision to commit suicide, supervising the actual suicide, and helping the individual 
carry out the necessary physical actions to effectively complete the suicide. 

Biblical and Theological Considerations 

1 . Man as the Image of God: Man was created in the image of God, and was given 
dominion over the earth as the representative of God's sovereign rule over all creation 
(Genesis 1:26-28). As the image of God, man has the design and capacity for unique 
fellowship with the Triune God and with his fellow man (John 17:20-24; 2 Corinthians 
13:14). Man bears the responsibility as God's image to reflect His holy nature (1 Peter 
1:15,16). Man as God's image deserves to be respected, valued, and loved; and so God 
commands, "You shall love your neighbor as yourself" (Leviticus 19:18, Mark 12:28-34). 



141 



Anyone who willfully injures or destroys God's image without His explicit sanction dem- 
onstrates a lack of love and reverence for God Himself. 

2. The Image of God and the Intentional Destruction of Human Life: The fact that God 
still values sinful man as the bearer of His image is revealed in His abhorrence of the 
murder of Abel by Cain (Genesis 4:9-1 1), and in His statement to Noah following the great 
flood: "Whoever sheds man's blood, by man his blood shall be shed; for in the image of 
God He made man" (Genesis 9:6). The Sixth Commandment states, "You shall not mur- 
der" (Exodus 20:13). Scripture sanctions the destruction of human life only under the 
following circumstances: when the governmental authority acts to resist and punish evil 
(Genesis 9:6; Romans 13:1-5), or when it is unintentional or accidental (as may occur in 
self-defense or to protect the lives of others: see Numbers 35:9-12; Deuteronomy 19:1-6; 
Joshua 20:1-6; Luke 22:38). There are no other Bible based sanctions for permitting the 
intentional destruction of human life. 

3. The Body as the Temple of the Holy Spirit: The Apostle Paul wrote the following about 
Christians in First Corinthians: 

Or do you not know that your body is the temple of the Holy Spirit who is in you, 

whom you have from God, and that you are not your own? 

For you were bought at a price; therefore glorify God in your body 

(1 Corinthians 6:19,20; cf. Romans 8:9-11). 
This passage teaches that our bodies are God's temple and possession, and we are there- 
fore responsible to Him to be good stewards of our bodies. This truth refutes the popular 
concept held by many that they have an autonomous right to do as they wish with their own 
bodies: such thinking is a rejection of God's declared purposes for our bodies as revealed 
in Scripture; and, as such, is an expression of sinful rebellion against our Creator. 

4. Suffering and Death for the Christian: Death was the consequence for man's sin 
(Romans 6:23); but the Good News is that, "God so loved the world that He gave His one 
and only Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life" 
(John 3:16). The death and resurrection of Jesus Christ have given believers ultimate 
victory over death (1 Corinthians 15). Because of the wonderful glimpse of resurrection 
life in Revelation chapters 21 and 22, it is only natural that Christians will at times long 
for the release which death will bring from the sorrows and suffering of this world (2 
Corinthians 5:1-8; Philippians 1:19-26). Scripture, however, teaches that some suffering 
is a normal part of preparing believers for eternity. Suffering is part of the cross which 
God has ordained that Christians should bear for the sake of growth in faith and Christian 
character (Luke 14:27; James 1:2-4; 1 Peter 1:3-9). 

There is no spiritual benefit from needless physical suffering; to the contrary, the church is 
called to continue in Christ's ministry of relief to those who are suffering (Psalm 72:12-14; 
James 5:13-15). Christians should encourage medical intervention which relieves physi- 
cal pain and suffering in order that we may maintain our ability to witness to the grace of 
the Lord Jesus Christ (Matthew 5:13-16; 1 Corinthians 6:12). If pain is not completely 
eliminated. Christians should see this as an opportunity to share in the sufferings of Christ; 
knowing that He has promised His faithful presence with them (Psalm 23:4; John 16:33; 
Philippians 3:10,1 1). Sharing in the fellowship of Christ's sufferings precedes sharing in 
the fellowship of His resurrection. 



Application of Biblical Principles 

1. Life Support and Active Euthanasia: Modem technology has placed before Christians 
the option of artificial life support. God has given man the intelligence to develop tech- 
nologies which save physical life; and prolonging this mortal life is praiseworthy if it 

142 



provides additional opportunity to glorify God in ministry (Philippians 1:19-26). If a 
physical condition of progressive deterioration develops from which there is no medical 
hope of recovery and which has not been healed through intercessory prayer, there is no 
theological reason to prolong life artificially using modern technology. The determination 
to discontinue (or not to initiate) artificial life-support should be made only after thorough 
medical and pastoral consultation. There is a profound difference between allowing a 
person to die comfortably without life-prolonging measures, and actively causing the 
person's death ("active euthanasia"; whether by suicide, assisted suicide, or so-called 
"mercy-killing" by someone else). Although the motive of wanting to end suffering may 
seem reasonable enough, the practice of active euthanasia is an irreversible decision made 
by fallible humans at a time of great vulnerability. Active euthanasia sinfully destroys the 
temple and image of God. Instead, Christians need to follow the precedent of Holy Scrip- 
ture and historic church tradition, and leave the timing of death in the hands of God. 

2. Compassion and Hope: Both caregivers and those suffering from a life-threatening 
illness may experience physical, emotional, and/or spiritual pain when faced with a pro- 
longed dying process, especially if there is any amount of unrelieved suffering present. 
Artificial life support has the potential for extending such suffering; and for this reason, 
people should make their explicit wishes known through available legal documents (such 
as Living Wills and Advance Directives for Health care). Christians should encourage the 
use of appropriate palliative and comfort measures for those faced with incurable life- 
threatening conditions: people skilled in pain and symptom control can do much to relieve 
physical suffering in most cases (organizations such as hospice may provide invaluable 
help in these efforts). Christians should remember that the temporary "sufferings of this 
present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us" 
(Romans 8:18; cf. 2 Corinthians 4:16-18). 



Conclusion 

We of the Conservative Congregational Christian Conference hereby: 

1 . Encourage all efforts to relieve unnecessary pain and suffering utilizing whatever ap- 
propriate measures are available, while always remaining obedient to God's Holy Word, 
and with the intent to affirm the sanctity of human life as created in the image of God; 

2. Encourage our membership to make their explicit wishes known through available 
legal documents; 

3. Oppose all efforts to condone or practice any form of Active Euthanasia and Assisted 
Suicide; 

4. Encourage local churches and individual believers in their responsibility to support 
patients and their families in biblical decision-making as well as providing comfort through 
a ministry of presence to those facing a most difficult time in their lives. 



143 



POSITION PAPER ON 
PORNOGRAPHY AND OBSCENITY 

The Conservative Congregational Christian Conference is aware of the widespread and 
harmful influence which pornography increasingly is having on our country. It has become 
clear to us that we can no longer remain idle while promoters of pornography contribute to 
the decline of the morals of society by advocating a lifestyle which is contrary to Biblical 
teaching, is harmful to the family, and is ultimately destructive to individuals. 

The word pornography is derived from two Greek words: pome which means "harlot," 
and graphein which means "to write." Originally, then, pornography referred to "the writ- 
ing of harlots" (poruographos). Today it refers to any explicit depictions of erotic behavior 
(as in pictures, photographs, writings, or books) which are intended to cause sexual ex- 
citement. 

Pornography has its roots in the abuse of sexual expression. The New Testament makes it 
abundantly clear that a cardinal vice of the pagan world was impurity and immorality. The 
Apostle Paul pays special attention to the sinful behavior characteristic of the Gentile 
world, particularly the sins of immorality and homosexuality (Romans 1 :24-27). Sexual 
sins head up a list of sins which characterized a world that had sunk deep into the deprav- 
ity of the flesh and of the spirit: the most fundamental sin being the rejection of God and 
His righteous ways (Romans 1:21,25,28,32). Today, in our secular and humanistic society, 
the Biblically condemned forms of sexual immorality are not only tolerated but openly 
promoted as "alternate life styles" which should be accepted. 

Standing in sharp contrast are the Scriptures which condemn fornication (Eph. 5:3; Col. 
3:5), adultery (Lev. 20:10; Rom. 1:24), incest (Lev. 18:6; I Cor. 5:1), homosexuality (Lev. 
20:13; Rom. 1:24), bestiality (Lev. 18:23), and prostitution (Lev. 19:29; Eph. 5:5). Also the 
Old Testament makes it clear that the presence of evil sexual practices was a major cause 
for God's judgment upon Sodom and Gomorrah (Gen. 19:5,13). Scripture tells us "it is 
God's will that you should be sanctified; that you should avoid sexual immorality; that 
each of you should learn to control his own body in a way that is holy and honorable, not in 
passionate lust like the heathen, who do not know God..." (I Thess. 4:3-5). 

Pornography is one form of depraved man's insistence on explicit sexual activity. Pornog- 
raphy is known to visually depict, and by inference, to approve and encourage, most if not 
all of the earlier mentioned forms of sexual immorality. Pornography is especially degrad- 
ing to women since most pornography involves the use of women in subordinate and 
degrading roles for the purpose of sexual exploitation. In many cases it fosters the mental- 
ity which considers women as only objects which exist to gratify the selfish and sometimes 
sadistic desires of men. Pornography is a form of profound hostility toward women. 

In recent years, pornography has moved rapidly beyond adult scenes involving nudity and 
heterosexual intercourse to scenes which depict homosexuality, bestiality, and group sex 
orgies. Perhaps even worse is its exploitation of children. Our sensitivities are outraged at 
the degrading roles which children are called upon to perform. Often the result is perma- 
nent emotional damage to the child, and in some cases, death by murder. Today, "Kiddie 
Porn" is a fast growing and profitable segment of the pornography industry. Its focus is on 
children at an early or pre-adolescent age. For the sake of these children, this outrageous 
exploitation must stop. 

Less explicit, but with the potential to be just as morally harmful, are the activities of our 
film and television industries. Too often the Judeo-Christian values which call for sexual 
faithfulness to one partner in marriage are either ignored or distorted. Too often the media 
seems determined to present adultery, incest, prostitution, and in some cases, homosexu- 
ality, as the normal way of life. The positive portrayal of Christians is also a missing 
ingredient in an industry which often claims to simply reflect that which is social reality or 
that which the public wants. 

Through the use of "soft core" pornography, the television and film industries promote 
sexual values which are blatantly anti-Christian. Furthermore, many of the life-styles and 
values which are modeled on the screen work against the traditional community values of 
society. Media values are often in direct contradiction to those life styles and values which 

144 



are modeled and proclaimed in the Scriptures as examples of holy living. Such holy living 
is pleasing to God and healthy for us. 

We are deeply alarmed at the spread of all levels of pornography as modern technology is 
utilized. With the rise in popularity of cable television, video cassette recording, "dial-a- 
porn", and personal computers, the distribution of pornography is made even easier. As an 
industry, it is now a multibillion dollar business and is often linked to organized crime. 
This expanded access means increased availability in our homes to both adults and unsu- 
pervised children. 

Those who indulge in pornography also may become victims as they experience a need for 
escalation. Much research indicates that pomograpny is both seductive and addictive. It 
desensitizes the viewer and creates an appetite for even more sexually explicit material. 
This addiction can happen to anyone who regularly opens himself to pornography's influ- 
ence. Other documentation shows that pornography in some cases is linked to violence in 
sex related crimes such as rape or child abuse. This kind of perverted sexual activity is the 
result of a society which has come to believe that sex is simply another natural appetite 
and that it should be satisfied regardless of its manner of satisfaction. 

It is time for Christians to wage war on pornography. Churches and individual Christians 
can no longer remain silent. We must call individuals to repentance by rebuking their sin 
and we must speak prophetically of God's certain judgment upon a society which tolerates 
such activity. It is time to insist on legislation and firm enforcement of laws which would 
prohibit those few who would seek to make financial gain by exploiting the fallen nature 
of mankind. "Righteousness exalts a nation, but sin is a reproach to any people" (Prov. 
14:34). 

We call on the President of the United States, the Department of Justice, the Postal Ser- 
vice, and all proper authorities to enforce those laws and statutes which already exist 
against sexually explicit material. We call on local Christians and local churches to be- 
come involved in their individual communities. We take note that the Supreme Court has 
ruled that pornography is not protected by the First Amendment and that obscenity shall 
be determined by local community standards. Thus, it is that we believe this evil can be 
reduced, controlled, or eliminated if we the people and our elected officials refuse to 
tolerate its presence in our local communities. 

In recognition of our obligation to uphold the righteousness of God, and recognizing that 
evil often exists because Christians too often remain silent, we, the Conservative Congre- 
gational Christian Conference, therefore: 

ADOPT this position statement condemning pornography; 

COMMIT ourselves to do everything we can to work toward the elimination of pornogra- 
phy in our society; 

PLEDGE OURSELVES 

- to reaffirm those scriptural principles which promote human dignity, 

- to protect our families from sexual exploitation, 

- to provide healthy roles for the expression of human sexuality, 

- to pray that God will grant national repentance, to forgive our sin, and to deliver us 

fi-om our national obsession with all forms of sexual behavior which deviate 
from His revealed will. 

Other Position Papers available through the Conference Office: 

Christian Education 

and the Conservative Congregational Christian Conference 
Colleges, Bible Schools and Theological Seminaries 

and the Conservative Congregtional Christian Conference 
Missions 

and the Conservative Congregational Christian Conference 
Theology 

and the Conservative Congregational Christian Conference 



145 



ANNUAL MEETINGS 

1948 Chicago, Illinois North Shore Church 

1949 Chicago, Illinois Central Park Congregational Church 

1950 Milwaukee, Wisconsin Finnish Lutheran Congregational Church 

1951 No meeting 

1952 Chicago, Illinois Salem Evangelical Free Church 

1953 Wheaton, Illinois College Church of Christ 

1954 Chicago, Illinois Central Park Congregational Church 

1955 Oshkosh, Wisconsin Plymouth Congregational Church 

1956 St. Paul, Minnesota University Avenue Congregational Church 

1957 W Williamsfield, Ohio W Williamsfield Congregational 

1958 Portland, Oregon Staub Memorial Congregational Church 

1959 Argos, Indiana Argos Congregational Christian Church 

1960 North Collins, New York First Congregational Church 

1961 Carlisle, Massachusetts Carlisle Congregational Church 

1962 Oshkosh, Wisconsin Plymouth Congregational Church 

1963 Lima, Ohio Calvary Church, Conservative Congregational 

1964 Mobridge, South Dakota Conservative Congregational Church 

1965 Scotia, New York East Glenville Community Church 

1966 Pasadena, California Lake Avenue Congregational Church 

1967 Buffalo Center, Iowa First Congregational Church 

1968 Boston, Massachusetts Park Street Church 

1969 Wheaton, Illinois The College Church 

1970 Vista, California Community Church of Vista 

1971 Wheaton, Illinois Wheaton College 

1972 Wenham, Massachusetts Gordon College 

1973 St. Paul, Minnesota Northwestern College 

1974 Portland, Oregon Multnomah School of the Bible 

1975 Grand Rapids, Michigan Calvin College 

1976 Cape May, New Jersey Cape May Bible College 

1977 Ripon, Wisconsin Ripon College 

1978 San Diego, California Point Loma College 

1979 Grand Rapids, Michigan Calvin College 

1980 Waterloo, Ontario University of Waterloo 

1981 Superior, Wisconsin University of Wisconsin 

1982 Estes Park, Colorado YMCA of the Rockies 

1983 St. Paul, Minnesota Bethel College 

1984 Wenham, Massachusetts Gordon College 

1985 Green Lake, Wisconsin Green Lake Center 

1986 San Diego, California Point Loma College 

1987 Grand Rapids, Michigan Calvin College 

1988 Houghton, New York Houghton College 

1989 Wheaton, Illinois Wheaton College 

1990 Estes Park, Colorado YMCA of the Rockies 

1991 Grand Rapids, Michigan Calvin College 

1992 Wenham, Massachusetts Gordon College 

1993 Rochester, Minnesota Kahler Hotel 

1994 San Diego, Cahfomia Town and Country Hotel 

1995 Tulsa, Oklahoma Adam's Mark Hotel 

1996 Dayton, Ohio University of Dayton 

1997 Greeley, Colorado University of Northern Colorado 

1998 Minneapolis, Minnesota Regal Minneapolis Hotel 

1999 Sturbridge, Massachussetts Sturbridge Conference Center 

2000 Green Lake, Wisconsin Green Lake Conference Center 

2001 Spokane, Washington DoubleTree Hotel 

2002 Lansing, Michigan Holiday Inn - Lansing West 

146 



SERVICES OFFERED BY 
THE CONFERENCE 

IDENTIFICATION 

With evangelical and theologically conservative 

Congregational Christian and Evangelical and Reformed churches 
PLACEMENT 

Assistance to churches seeking a new pastor 
SUNDAY SCHOOL AND BULLETINS 

At 5% savings 
BIBLES, BOOKS AND HYMNALS 

Usually at 20% savings 
VBS 

At 15% savings 
RETIREMENT AND MEDICAL INSURANCE BENEFITS 

Individual retirement plans for ministers and Christian Workers 

Individual health insurance plans 

Group Disability Plan Agent - Dan Quinn - 1-877-842-4453 

ANNUAL MEETINGS 

For Conference business, instruction, inspiration and fellowship 

with member churches, ministers and lay leaders 
AREA FELLOWSHIP 

Meetings and activities throughout the U.S. ' 

CHURCH MULTIPLICATION 

Cooperation in beginning new. Gospel-preaching churches 
FINANCIAL AID TO STRUGGLING CHURCHES 

In their building and improvement programs through Cornerstone Corps 
EMERGENCY PASTORAL AID 

In times of acute financial need 
EMERGENCY CHURCH RELIEF 

In times of flood, fire, earthquake, and storm 
ENDORSEMENT OF QUALIFIED MINISTERS 

To serve in the Armed Forces as chaplains 
BI-MONTHLY MAILING OF FORESEE 

To all member CCCC churches, ministers, and lay people 
JOINT MISSIONS EFFORT 

In areas of mutual concern 
WORLD FELLOWSHIP 

With Evangelical Congregationalists in other countries through the 

World Evangelical Congregational Fellowship 
SCHOLARSHIPS 

For qualifying students under Conference Care 



147 



c c 
c c 



FORESEE PUBLICATIONS 

Your CCCC Bookstore and Resource Center 

The Literature ministry of the CCCC 

15S2 Currell Blvd., Suite #108, St. Paul, MN 55125 

Phone: 651-739-1474 Fax: 651-739-0750 

email: gmbrimmer@ccccusa.org 



FORESEE PUBLICATIONS 



Sunday School and Vacation Bible School Curriculum published by 

Accent Scripture Pres 

David C. Cook Standard 

Gospel Light Child Evangelism Fellowship 

Group Through The Bible 

Faith Weaver 

Call or write for curriculum review. 

Bibles, hymnals and Christian books (Bible Studies, 
Women's - Children - Marriage - Finances) 

Discounted, call for price quote. 

Church Bulletin Series prepared by CATHEDRAL ART 

Church Supplies 

Communion Supphes 

Conference Publications such as 
"There Are Modem Day Pilgrims", "Roots, Stem, and Flowers", 
"New Life In Chrisf and 
the CCCC History Book - "Modem Day Pilgrims". 

Congregational Publications 

Offering Envelopes (custom made) 
Available through "Foresee Publications Envelope Service". 



How can we serve you? 



CONSERVATIVE 
CONGREGATIONAL 
CHRISTIAN 
CONFERENCE 

54th Annual Meeting 

Holiday Inn - Lansing West 

Lansing, Michigan 

July 22-25, 2002 



55th Annual Meeting 

Founders Inn 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

July 2 1-24, 2003 



Write or call for program and registration information. 
Conservative Congregational Christian Conference 

7582 Currell Blvd., #108, St. Paul, MN 55125 

Phone: 651-739-1474 Fax: 651-739-0750 

email: dmjohnson@ccccusa.org